2002 Progress Report: Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE)

EPA Grant Number: R828771
Center: HSRC (2001) - Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments
Center Director: Bouwer, Edward J.
Title: Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE)
Investigators: Bouwer, Edward J. , Oguntimein, G. B. , Baker, Joel E. , Smets, Barth F. , Fairbrother, D. Howard , Helble, Joseph J. , Roberts, A. Lynn , Ondov, John M. , Ball, William P. , O'Melia, Charles R. , Stone, Alan T. , Sattler, Barbara , Meneveau, Charles , Perkins, Chris , Haag, George , Chen, Guangming , Alavi, Hedy , Parlange, Marc , Nikolaidis, Nik , Mason, Robed , Carley, Robert , Williams, Sedley
Current Investigators: Bouwer, Edward J. , Alavi, Hedy
Institution: The Johns Hopkins University , University of Maryland - College Park , Morgan State University , University of Connecticut
Current Institution: The Johns Hopkins University
EPA Project Officer: Klieforth, Barbara I
Project Period: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2007
Project Period Covered by this Report: October 1, 2001 through September 30, 2002
Project Amount: $6,000,000
RFA: Hazardous Substance Research Centers - HSRC (2001) Recipients Lists
Research Category: Hazardous Waste/Remediation , Land and Waste Management

Objective:

The Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE) completed its first year of existence under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Substance Research Centers. The CHSUE is a cooperative activity between Johns Hopkins University (JHU) (lead institution), University of Maryland (UM), Morgan State University (MSU), University of Connecticut (UConn), and New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), and covers EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3. About 80 percent of the U.S. population lives in metropolitan areas. These urban residents face a number of pressing environmental problems including exposure to toxic chemicals from contaminated sites, landfills, incinerators, abandoned industrial sites (Brownfields), industrial releases, lead, and pesticide use. In this context, EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3 have identified "Urban Livability" as a strategic priority. Focusing on the upper mid-Atlantic to the Northeast, the main objectives of the CHSUE are twofold: (1) to promote a better understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes for detecting, assessing, and managing risks associated with the use and disposal of hazardous substances in urban environments; and (2) to disseminate the results of the research and provide technical expertise to various stakeholders including community groups, municipal officials, regulators, academia, and industry.

Progress Summary:

Through a combination of laboratory- and field-scale research, the CHSUE is addressing contaminants and sources that are known to be prevalent in urban environments. These include gas and particulate emissions of mercury, other toxic metals, and organic compounds from contaminated sites and hazardous waste incinerators; chromium, arsenic, nickel, zinc, and cadmium in waters and soils; and chlorinated solvents in waste-site gases, soils, sediments, and groundwaters. The progress with the CHSUE's Research program is described in this section. The initial research projects are 2-year projects with a start date of October 1, 2001. The objectives of the projects have not changed from the original application.

Initial Research Projects and Participants. Risks to humans from toxic materials in urban environments come from contaminated groundwater and airborne particles and from direct or indirect exposure to contaminated soils. Several of the initial research projects within this Center are aimed at better quantifying the sources and cycling of toxicants and exposure pathways. Improvements in characterizing the sources and pathways will, in turn, make it possible to determine whether exposure levels have been or will be high enough to cause adverse health effects. Improved exposure assessment can be used to determine priorities for risk management and for determining appropriate clean-up levels for contaminated sites.

Once the risks of exposure from urban sites are quantified, risk management will be implemented to prevent or control the impact of toxic materials on human health and ecological systems. Risk management decisions generally consider the technical feasibility of treatment methods along with societal values and economics. Some of the research projects that address exposure pathways also provide information that can be used to assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation as a means to reduce risks at contaminated sites. One research project is developing an innovative treatment method for halogenated solvents in vapor waste streams.

Participants in the Research Program. The interdisciplinary and multimedia nature of urban environmental problems demand a diverse array of scientific talent and facilities. The location and expertise of each Principal Investigator for the initial research program are detailed below.

JHU, Baltimore, MD (Lead Institution). Faculty from the Departments of Geography and Environmental Engineering (DoGEE), Mechanical Engineering (ME), and Chemistry at JHU are participating in the initial research projects:

· Director: Edward Bouwer (DoGEE) (environmental engineering, bioremediation, and engineering microbiology).
· Associate Director: Hedy Alavi (DoGEE) (environmental engineering, hazardous waste, and solid waste management).
· William Ball (DoGEE) (environmental engineering, contaminant fate and transport).
· Howard Fairbrother (Chemistry) (surface spectroscopy and catalysis, and corrosion process).
· Charles Meneveau (ME) (turbulence modeling, large-eddy simulation).
· Charles O'Melia (DoGEE) (environmental engineering, colloid chemistry).
· Marc Parlange (DoGEE) (environmental fluid mechanics).
· A. Lynn Roberts (DoGEE) (environmental chemistry, zero-valent metals/contaminant reactions).
· Alan Stone (DoGEE) (environmental inorganic chemistry).

UM, College Park, MD. Faculty from the Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory (CBL) (Solomons, MD) and the Department of Chemistry at UM are participating in the initial research projects:

· Joel Baker (CBL) (transport and fate of organic compounds in environmental media).
· Robert Mason (CBL) (transport and fate of mercury in environmental media).
· John Ondov (Chemistry) (movement and chemistry of aerosol particles).

MSU, Baltimore, MD. The following three faculty from the School of Engineering at MSU are participating in an initial research project:

· Guangming Chen (Industrial) (risk assessment, experimental design, and statistics).
· G.B. Oguntimein (Civil) (chemical engineering, hazardous waste management, bioremediation).
· Sedley Williams (Civil) (soil chemistry, water quality analysis, environmental assessment, geographic information systems [GIS]).

UConn, Storrs, CT. Faculty from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering at the UConn are participating in the initial research projects:

· Joe Helble (Chemical Engineering) (air pollutants from combustion processes).
· Allison MacKay (Environmental Engineering) (environmental organic chemistry, contaminant hydrology).
· Barth Smets (Environmental Engineering) (contaminant biotransformations, microbial ecology)

Initial Research Projects. Seven research projects (RP) are underway in the CHSUE. The title, list of collaborators, and a brief summary of the goals and results for each RP are given below.

RP #1 and RP #2 address potential exposure pathways from airborne particles.

RP#1: The Fate and Potential Bioavailability of Airborne Urban Contaminants. Robert Mason (UM), Joel Baker (UM), and John Ondov (UM). The objective of this project is to improve our knowledge of chemical properties of atmospheric particles. The effort will evaluate the importance of coarse particles entrained to the atmosphere from hazardous waste and Brownfields sites as a source of contaminants to surrounding waters, and to humans via inhalation. Particles/aerosols will be collected using an ultra high-volume sampler (coupled to Supersite program), and samples will be analyzed for metals (Hg) and organics (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]) and contacted with distilled water to assess dissolution kinetics. One challenge for this research project is to collect enough aerosol mass for subsequent chemical analysis and leaching studies. Much of the first year was devoted to optimizing the bulk sample collection equipment in terms of cyclone collection efficiency and performance of the Teflon membrane filters at particle capture. Collected aerosol samples will be analyzed in Year 2 for mercury and organic chemicals.

RP#2: Measurements and Large Eddy Simulations of Plume Dispersion in an Urban Boundary Layer. Marc Parlange (JHU), Charles Meneveau (JHU), Joseph Helble (UConn), and John Ondov (UM). The objective of this project is to determine how spatial variability of surface heat fluxes and topography, land-water contrasts, drainage flows at night, and weather patterns influence atmospheric particle transport. A combination of measurements and models will be used to describe the transport of aerosols in an urban setting. Regional-scale atmospheric turbulence will be modeled by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Lidar will be used to assess the performance of the LES code. The modeling results for airflow around a representative building shape confirm that physically realistic flow patterns are obtained. Lidar aerosol profiles were measured during the Canadian forest fire event of July 7, 2002. These data confirm that the JHU lidar can be used to measure the transport patterns of aerosols and help validate the LES simulations. Additional work in this project has centered on developing the sampling methods and characterization approach for determining particle morphology via transmission electron microscopy.

RP #3 and RP #4 are addressing transport and fate issues for metal and organic contaminants in the subsurface to provide input on exposure pathways from contaminated groundwaters and soils. The research also involves reaction processes that are important in natural attenuation of contaminants. Therefore, these two projects also contribute to risk management issues.

RP#3: Geochemistry, Biochemistry, and Surface/Groundwater Interactions for As, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Cd with Applications to Contaminated Waterfronts. Allison MacKay (UConn) and Barth Smets (UConn). The objective of this project is to evaluate processes that govern the fate of heavy metals discharging to water bodies at contaminated waterfront sites. The hypothesis is that heavy-metal flux is governed by anaerobic microbial activity that may mobilize or retard the transport of metal species. Geoprobe direct push sampling of pore water and solids in transects across the shoreline at one or more contaminated waterfront sites will be used to document redox processes involving the metal contaminants. Spatial distributions of As, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Cd will be quantified in the collected soil and liquid samples. Genotypic probing will assess the relative abundance of microbial activities. The selection of an appropriate field site is underway in consultation with Dick Willey of EPA Region 1 and Maurice Hamel of the Connecticut (CT) Department of Environmental Protection.

RP#4: Co-Contaminant Effects on Risk Assessment and Remediation Activities Involving Urban Sediments and Soils. William Ball (JHU) and Edward Bouwer (JHU). This project focuses on organic contaminant mixtures, with an emphasis on improved approaches for modeling the combined effects of both sorption and biodegradation. Modeling has been conducted to better understand the role of nonlinear adsorption on long-term desorption and biodegradation. The results obtained to date have shown that desorptive mass flux can be extremely sensitive to the parameters used to model sorption. Because desorptive mass flux is an important determinant of contaminant persistence at waste sites, very careful experimentation will be required to fully understand long-term and nonlinear contaminant distribution. The effort will evaluate sources and mechanisms of competitive sorption in environmentally relevant soils and sediments. Alternative approaches for quantifying rates of biodegradation in complex mixtures of organic chemicals will be developed and evaluated. Solids will be characterized for organic matter and black carbon (charcoals, soot, and coal).

RP #5 is improving the method used for measuring the speciation of chromium so that we can more accurately assess its toxicity in all environmental media. The improved chromium speciation procedure will be used in the latter stages of RP #3 and in subsequent chromium research within the Center.

RP#5: Speciation of Chromium in Environmental Media Using Capillary Electrophoresis with Multiple Wavlength UV/Visible Detection. Alan Stone (JHU) and Charles O'Melia (JHU). The speciation of Cr controls its transport and fate at waste sites. The diphenylcarbazide test for distinguishing Cr(VI) from Cr(III) is most common, but is subject to interference problems. A capillary electrophoresis method is being developed for identifying and quantifying Cr(VI) and Cr(III) species. Capillary electrophoresis allows analytical separation based on differences in the charge and hydrodynamic radii of analyte complexes. The results show that Cr(III)-containing low molecular-weight complexes can be efficiently resolved from one another and from the Cr(VI) species HCrO4- and CrO4-2. The detection limits range between 1 and 3 µM. The method will be validated using samples from pristine and Cr-contaminated field sites. The method will be used in future Center projects dealing with assessment and control issues with Cr contamination.

RP #6 is focusing on remediation of chlorinated solvents in vapors through an innovative technology that provides greater permanent risk reduction at potentially lower cost.

RP#6: Zero-Valent Metal Treatment of Halogenated Vapor-Phase Contaminants in SVE Offgas. A. Lynn Roberts (JHU) and Howard Fairbrother (JHU). The objective of this project is to evaluate if zero-valent metal technology can be used to treat organohalides in gas streams that contain oxygen. Reductants are being screened for reactivity and selectivity in batch systems containing a variety of bimetallic reductants and dissolved oxygen. The rates of reaction of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) with Ni/Fe, Co/Fe, Cu/Fe, and Fe alone were compared in batch studies. Among the three bimetallic systems, the reaction rates with Ni/Fe were significantly faster. Additional batch reactors were used to investigate the effect of nickel loading on the observed rates of reaction. At low Ni loadings, the rate of cis-DCE removal increases quickly with Ni concentration, but at higher Ni loadings, the rate increases more slowly. Cis-DCE was introduced as a vapor into a column containing Fe or Ni/Fe. The cis-DCE gas-phase concentration decreased along the length of the column with an accumulation of ethene and ethane, suggesting that cis-DCE is partitioning into the aqueous phase and undergoing reductive dehalogenation at the iron or bimetallic surface. The effort will assess how the changing composition of the solution phase affects the reactivity of the metal or bimetallic reductant. Reaction rates and products will be monitored. Finally, batch and column tests also will be integrated to assess cost effectiveness and projected design life.

RP #7 is surveying selected Brownfield sites in Baltimore and developing a GIS inventory of environmental data and activities at these sites.

RP#7: Environmental Assessment and GIS System Development of Brownfield Sites in Baltimore. Guangming Chen (MSU), Gbekeloluwa Oguntimein (MSU), and Sedley Williams (MSU). The objectives of this research project are: (1) to work in collaboration with city, state, and federal partners to collect, analyze, and document the data on the locations, usage history, risk factors, and potential for remediation of selected existing Brownfield sites in the Park Heights community within Baltimore; and (2) to develop a comprehensive GIS inventory of environmental activities at these sites and conduct outreach activities that will provide community service, environmental education, and information through the creation of a partnership with stakeholders impacted by Brownfields. This project team has conducted the following activities: (1) site visits and interviews with the residents; (2) information gathering through contacts with the Park Reist Corridor Coalition, library and internet search, and visits to Baltimore City Hall; (3) a survey of the auto-body shops in the Park Heights Reisterstown corridor with the objective of determining the environmental impact of the auto-body operation; and (4) GIS mapping of the Park Heights community using ArcGIS 8. The latter entails a GIS-layered database and query systems to display all assessment results on the GIS map.

Outreach Program. The CHSUE Outreach Program is a collaborative effort between JHU (lead institution), UConn (representing EPA Region 1), NJIT (representing EPA Region 2), and UM (representing EPA Region 3). The objective of the Outreach Program is to transfer knowledge and technology resulting from the research projects and expertise of the Principal Investigators and technical staff to communities with environmental contamination throughout the regions.

The principal efforts of the Outreach Program include two distinct, but interrelated, components: Technical Outreach Services for Communities (TOSC) and Technical Assistance to Brownfields Communities (TAB). The objective of TOSC is to provide technical assistance and education to communities affected by hazardous waste, and to assist them with the restoration of their environment and neighborhood. The objective of TAB is to assist municipal officials, developers, and community groups with meeting the challenges of sustainable Brownfields redevelopment by providing education and technical assistance on the application of advanced science and technology.

The outreach activities during the period from October 1, 2001 to September 30, 2002, include 13 projects geographically distributed across EPA Regions 1, 2, and 3. Six projects are allocated under TOSC, and seven projects are allocated under TAB. The TOSC and TAB efforts include review of site characterization documents and remedial plans, review of hydrogeological data, workshops on Brownfields legislation and issues and remedial options for waste sites, training in redevelopment of Brownfield sites and former industrial areas, and communicating health effects for contaminants and information on health monitoring.

Advisory Committee. Two external advisory committees provide guidance to the CHSUE. Our Science Advisory Committee (SAC) is comprised of 16 representatives from EPA, industry, government offices and laboratories, and academia (Table 1). Professor Paul Roberts serves as Chair of the SAC. The purpose for the SAC is to assist the CHSUE in evaluating the merit, value, and contribution of research projects, and the relevance and importance of individual organizational elements to accomplishing the overall objectives of the Center. The first SAC meeting was held on October 21-22, 2002.

Our Outreach Advisory Committee (OAC) is comprised of 11 representatives from EPA, other government offices, and the community (Table 2). The purpose for the OAC is to assist the CHSUE in the development, implementation, and evaluation of education, knowledge transfer, and outreach activities and to identify outreach funding opportunities. The first OAC meeting will be held on November 7, 2002.

Table 1. Members of the SAC

Name Representation
Roberts, Paul; Chair Emeritus Professor, Stanford University
DiCola, Ron Assistant Director Environmental Affairs, Pfizer, Inc.
Grasso, Domenic Rosemary Bradford Hewlett Professor and Chair, Smith College
Harris, Reginald Senior Toxicologist, U.S. EPA Region 3
Inyang, Hilary Duke Energy Distinguished Professor, The University of North Carolina-Charlotte
Johnson, James Dean and Professor, Howard University
Josephs, Jon Hazardous Substances Liaison, U.S. EPA Region 2
Josephson, Jeff Special Assistant to the Director, U.S. EPA Region 2
Krammer, Kurt Environmental Manager, FMC Corporation
Kulujian, Norm Superfund Coordinator, U.S. EPA Region 3
Linak, William Chemical Engineer, United States EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division
Lorah, Michelle Research Hydrologist
MacFarlane, Ian Branch Manager, EA Engineering, Science, and Technology
Summers, Robert Director, Waste Management Administration, Maryland Department of the Environment
Willey, Richard Hydrologist, U.S. EPA Region 1
Yen, Chen Vice President, Gannett Fleming, Inc.

Table 2. Members of the OAC

Name Representation
Burke, Mike Senior State Liaison Officer, U.S. EPA Region 3
Charles, Larry Director and Member, ONE/Chane and National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee
Harris, Elissa Environmental Equity Coordinator, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
Johnson, Stacey Hartford City Program Manager, U.S. EPA Region 1 Urban Environmental Initiative
McGuigan, Doris President, Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn
Murphy, Jim RAA, U.S. EPA Region 1
Pitruzzello, Vincent Chief, Program Support Branch, Emergency and Remedial Response Division, U.S. EPA Region 2
Rosso, Mary Delegate, Maryland House of Delegates
Shaw, Judith Administrator, Brownfields Office, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Wilson, Shari Director of Policy Management, Maryland Department of the Environment
Yates, Harold Senior Community Involvement Coordinator, U.S. EPA Region 3


Other Activities. In addition to the research and outreach programs, the CHSUE participated in several other noteworthy activities in the past year.

The CHSUE cosponsored a meeting on June 11-12, 2002, to address emerging environmental health threats to children from contaminated school sites. There is a trend nationwide to build new public schools on contaminated lands, often abandoned, idled, or underused industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination. Schools do not fall under any program for environmental assessment and cleanup leading to a large number of schools being built on or near hazardous waste sites with little or no protection from exposure. A common school siting practice is to use standardized (adult-based) risk assessment to determine safety and the need for cleanup. Two topics were discussed at this meeting, which are presented in the form of questions. First, is there a process that can be used for determining and establishing safe exposure levels for children exposed to toxic/hazardous chemicals in and around their school environment? Second, when land is identified as contaminated, but is needed nonetheless for siting a school, what cleanup technologies/methods are best suited to cleaning up the site? Because containment systems are often proposed, are they adequate when the future land use is a school? This 1 1/2-day meeting included experts in children's health, risk assessment, site remediation, regulations, environmental justice, education, and epidemiology. Members of the CHSUE that participated in this meeting included Hedy Alavi, William Ball, Edward Bouwer, Ian MacFarlane, Barbara Sattler, and Robyn Gilden. This meeting was funded with outside support; no EPA funds were used for this activity. The participants drafted recommendations for siting and testing guidelines that are currently being developed for congressional review and regulations aimed at school-siting criteria.

The CHSUE engaged in several technical seminars during the past year. Hedy Alavi and Ed Bouwer participated in the annual Director's meeting in Washington, D.C. on November 19-20, 2001. Hedy Alavi and Ed Bouwer made presentations on the research and outreach programs to the Maryland Environmental Business Alliance on March 22, 2002. Ed Bouwer discussed the Center's Research Program with interested EPA folk on March 26, 2002 (internet seminar format). Hedy Alavi and Ed Bouwer visited EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia on July 16, 2002, and made presentations on progress with the research and outreach programs. Howard Fairbrother made a presentation about our Center at the 224th American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting in Boston on August 19, 2002. As part of an exchange effort, Allison MacKay (UConn) was invited to give a seminar at JHU on September 6, 2002. Conference presentations on individual research projects are detailed in the attached Annual Report Summaries.

The CHSUE sponsored an internal workshop on September 6, 2002, at JHU to aid in knowledge transfer within the research program. The Principal Investigators for each of the seven research projects made presentations on their progress and future plans. This workshop allowed the Principal Investigators to: (1) share research progress through presentations, which will facilitate integration of the information in future work; (2) discuss future research directions; (3) discuss the first annual report; and (4) discuss the format for the October 21-22, 2002 SAC meeting.

Future Activities:

The CHSUE will continue to: (1) promote a better understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes for detecting, assessing, and managing risks associated with the use and disposal of hazardous substances in urban environments; and (2) disseminate the results of the research and provide technical expertise to various stakeholders including community groups, municipal officials, regulators, academia, and industry.


Journal Articles: 20 Displayed | Download in RIS Format

Other center views: All 108 publications 22 publications in selected types All 20 journal articles
Type Citation Sub Project Document Sources
Journal Article Bou-Zeid E, Meneveau C, Parlange MB. Large-eddy simulation of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over heterogeneous surfaces: blending height and effective surface roughness. Water Resources Research 2004;40:W02505.
abstract available  
R828771C004 (2004)
R828771C004 (2005)
R828771C004 (Final)
  • Abstract: AGU Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: AGU PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Bou-Zeid E, Meneveau C, Parlange M. A scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flows. Physics of Fluids 2005;17:025105.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771C004 (2005)
    R828771C004 (Final)
  • Abstract: AIP Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: AIP PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Carbonaro RF, Stone AT. Speciation of chromium(III) and cobalt(III) (Amino)carboxylate complexes using capillary electrophoresis. Analytical Chemistry. 2005;77(1):155-164. R828771C005 (2004)
    not available
    Journal Article CHSUE assisted with preparation. Description of the Phase II HSRC grants. 2002 Centerpoint 2002;7(1). R828771 (2002)
    not available
    Journal Article Crimmins BS, Baker JE. Improved GC/MS methods for measuring hourly PAH and nitro-PAH concentrations in urban particulate matter. Atmospheric Environment 2006;40(35):6764-6779.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C015 (Final)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full-Text
    Exit
  • Other: ScienceDirect-PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Crimmins BS, Baker JE. Measurement of aerosol PAH and Nitro-PAH concentrations in ambient urban air with hourly resolution. Atmospheric Environment. R828771C015 (2005)
    not available
    Journal Article Gan P, Yu R, Smets BF, MacKay AA. Sampling methods to determine the spatial gradients and flux of arsenic at a groundwater seepage zone. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 2006;25(6):1487-1495.
    abstract available  
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C013 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley
    Exit
  • Journal Article Haws NW, Ball WP, Bouwer EJ. Modeling and interpreting bioavailability of organic contaminant mixtures in subsurface environments. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 2006;82(3-4):255-292.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771C001 (2004)
    R828771C001 (2005)
    R828771C001 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: Science Direct Full Text
    Exit
  • Other: Science Direct PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Haws NW, Bouwer EJ, Ball WP. The influence of biogeochemical conditions and level of model complexity when simulating cometabolic biodegradation in sorbent-water systems. Advances in Water Resources 2006;29(4):571-589.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771C001 (2005)
    R828771C001 (Final)
  • Full-text: Science Direct Full Text
    Exit
  • Abstract: Science Direct Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Science Direct PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Haws NW, Ball WP, Bouwer EJ. Effects of initial solute distribution on contaminant availability, desorption modeling, and subsurface remediation. Journal of Environmental Quality 2007;36(5):1392-1402.
    abstract available  
    R828771C001 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: JEQ Full Text
    Exit
  • Other: JEQ PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Landis MS, Stevens RK, Schaedlich F, Prestbo EM. Development and characterization of an annular denuder methodology for the measurement of divalent inorganic reactive gaseous mercury in ambient air. Environmental Science & Technology 2002;36(13):3000-3009.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C015 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Full-text: ResearchGate - Abstract & Full Text - PDF
    Exit
  • Abstract: ACS-Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Atmospheric-Research PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Laurier FJG, Mason RP, Whalin L, Kato S. Reactive gaseous mercury formation in the North Pacific Ocean's marine boundary layer: a potential role of halogen chemistry. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 2003;108(D17):4529, doi:10.1029/2003JD003625.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C015 (Final)
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article Nguyen TH, Sabbah I, Ball WP. Sorption nonlinearity for organic contaminants with diesel soot: method development and isotherm interpretation. Environmental Science & Technology 2004;38(13):3595-3603.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771C001 (2004)
    R828771C001 (2005)
    R828771C001 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Other: ACS Publications PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Pancras JP, Ondov JM, Zeisler R. Multi-element electrothermal AAS determination of 11 marker elements in fine ambient aerosol slurry samples collected with SEAS-II. Analytica Chimica Acta 2005;538(1-2):303-312.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C015 (2005)
    R828771C015 (Final)
  • Full-text: ScienceDirect-Full-Text
    Exit
  • Other: ScienceDirect - Full Text - PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Park SS, Pancras JP, Ondov J, Poor N. A new pseudodeterministic multivariate receptor model for individual source apportionment using highly time-resolved ambient concentration measurements. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 2005;110(D7):D07S15, doi:10.1029/2004JD004664.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C015 (2005)
    R828771C015 (Final)
  • Abstract: Wiley-Abstract
    Exit
  • Journal Article McGuire MM, Carlson DL, Vikesland PJ, Kohn T, Grenier AC, Langley LA, Roberts AL, Fairbrother DH. Applications of surface analysis in the environmental sciences: dehalogenation of chlorocarbons with zero-valent iron and iron-containing mineral surfaces. Analytica Chimica Acta. 2003;496(1-2):301-313.
    full text available
    R828771C006 (2003)
    R828164 (Final)
    not available
    Journal Article Grenier AC, McGuire MM, Fairbrother DH, Roberts AL. Treatment of vapor-phase organohalides with zero-valent iron and Ni/Fe reductants. Environmental Engineering Science. 2004;21(4):421-435. R828771C006 (2003)
    not available
    Journal Article Sabbah I, Ball WP, Young DF, Bouwer EJ. Misinterpretations in the modeling of contaminant desorption from environmental solids when equilibrium conditions are not fully understood. Environmental Engineering Science 2005;22(3):350-366.
    abstract available  
    R828771C001 (2004)
    R828771C001 (2005)
    R828771C001 (Final)
  • Abstract: Liebert Abstract
    Exit
  • Other: Liebert PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Tseng Y-H, Meneveau C, Parlange MB. Modeling flow around bluff bodies and predicting urban dispersion using large eddy simulation. Environmental Science & Technology 2006;40(8):2653-2662.
    abstract available   full text available
    R828771C004 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Other: American Chemical Society PDF
    Exit
  • Journal Article Yu R, Gan P, MacKay AA, Zhang S, Smets BF. Presence, distribution, and diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria at a landfill leachate-impacted groundwater surface water interface. FEMS Microbiology Ecology 2010;71(2):260-271.
    abstract available  
    R828771 (Final)
    R828771C013 (Final)
  • Abstract from PubMed
  • Abstract: Wiley Online-Abstract
    Exit
  • Supplemental Keywords:

    toxics, exposure assessment, cleanup, risk communication, geographic area., RFA, Scientific Discipline, INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION, Geographic Area, Waste, POLLUTANTS/TOXICS, Environmental Chemistry, Chemicals, Hazardous Waste, Brownfields, Mid-Atlantic, Ecological Risk Assessment, Hazardous, hazardous waste disposal, hazardous waste management, hazardous waste treatment, brownfield sites, environmental hazards, contaminated waste sites, mercury, urban waste management, Chromium, risk assessment , assessing metal speciation, chemical releases, cadmium, hazardous waste characterization, arsenic, heavy metals

    Relevant Websites:

    http://www.jhu.edu/hsrc/ Exit

    Progress and Final Reports:

    Original Abstract
  • 2003 Progress Report
  • 2004 Progress Report
  • 2005 Progress Report
  • 2006
  • Final Report
  • Subprojects under this Center: (EPA does not fund or establish subprojects; EPA awards and manages the overall grant for this center).
    R828771C001 Co-Contaminant Effects on Risk Assessment and Remediation Activities Involving Urban Sediments and Soils: Phase II
    R828771C002 The Fate and Potential Bioavailability of Airborne Urban Contaminants
    R828771C003 Geochemistry, Biochemistry, and Surface/Groundwater Interactions for As, Cr, Ni, Zn, and Cd with Applications to Contaminated Waterfronts
    R828771C004 Large Eddy Simulation of Dispersion in Urban Areas
    R828771C005 Speciation of chromium in environmental media using capillary electrophoresis with multiple wavlength UV/visible detection
    R828771C006 Zero-Valent Metal Treatment of Halogenated Vapor-Phase Contaminants in SVE Offgas
    R828771C007 The Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments (CHSUE) Outreach Program
    R828771C008 New Jersey Institute of Technology Outreach Program for EPA Region II
    R828771C009 Urban Environmental Issues: Hartford Technology Transfer and Outreach
    R828771C010 University of Maryland Outreach Component
    R828771C011 Environmental Assessment and GIS System Development of Brownfield Sites in Baltimore
    R828771C012 Solubilization of Particulate-Bound Ni(II) and Zn(II)
    R828771C013 Seasonal Controls of Arsenic Transport Across the Groundwater-Surface Water Interface at a Closed Landfill Site
    R828771C014 Research Needs in the EPA Regions Covered by the Center for Hazardous Substances in Urban Environments
    R828771C015 Transport of Hazardous Substances Between Brownfields and the Surrounding Urban Atmosphere