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RECORD NUMBER: 17 OF 23

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Non-Point Source Studies on Chesapeake Bay. VI. Particulate Discharge from Rhode River Subwatersheds, 1975.
Author Pierce, J. W. ; Dulong., F. T. ;
CORP Author Smithsonian Institution, Edgewater, Md. Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies. ;Chesapeake Research Consortium, Inc., Baltimore, Md.;National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C. Research Applied to National Needs.;Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
Year Published 1977
Report Number NSF-ENV76-22045 ;EPA-R-804536-01; NSF/RA-770384;
Stock Number PB-276 864
Additional Subjects Surface water runoff ; Sediments ; Rhode River ; Water pollution ; Monitoring ; Concentration(Composition) ; Particles ; Regression analysis ; Seasonal variations ; Volume ; Precipitation(Meteorology) ; Flow rate ; Tables(Data) ; Weirs ; Chesapeake Bay ; Maryland ; Suspended solids ; Nonpoint sources
Holdings
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Status
NTIS  PB-276 864 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 186p
Abstract
During Part VI of this project, aliquots of composited flow-integrated samples of water passing through eight v-notch weirs located on different subwatersheds of the Rhode River, Maryland were analyzed for total and mineral solids. The difference between total solids and mineral particles was allocated to the organic phase. Regression equations of solids discharge on water discharge showed that a second order equation was best for prediction of the concentrations of flow-integrated samples, in general explaining more than 80 percent of the variation in sediment discharge. Concentrations varied over three orders of magnitude, from a low of less than 1 mg/l of total solids to 1290 mg/l. Precipitation was 81 percent of average in 1974; 132 percent in 1975, giving much higher water discharge in 1975. Most of the water discharge occurs during spring and fall. Applied to the entire Rhode River watershed, negative discharges resulted during two seasons and on an annual basis.