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RECORD NUMBER: 22 OF 169

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Appreciative inquiry : a mechanism for maximizing empower in social systems /
Author Campbell, Daniel E. ; Campbell, D. E. ; Galloway, W. B. ; Pesch, G. G.
Other Authors
Author Title of a Work
Galloway, Walter B.
Pesch, Gerald G.
CORP Author National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Narragansett, RI. Atlantic Ecology Div.
Publisher U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division,
Year Published 1998
Report Number NHEERL-NAR-2011 ;EPA/600/A-98/084;
Stock Number PB98-151277
OCLC Number 728024489
Subjects Appreciative inquiry. ; Social sciences--Research. ; Organizational change. ; Organizational behavior. ; Social Change.
Additional Subjects Citizen participation ; Empowerment ; Communities ; Sociology ; Culture ; Feedback ; Efficiency ; Organizational structure ; Evolution(General) ; Statistical analysis ; Simulation ; Appreciative inquiry ; Social systems ; Social grups ; Heliotropic hypothesis ; Energy flow ; Energy system models
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=9100RROD.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
ESAD  EPA 600-A-98-084 Region 10 Library/Seattle,WA 06/07/2011
NTIS  PB98-151277 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 08/30/1998
Collation 9, [15] p. : ill., charts ; 28 cm.
Abstract
Appreciative inquire explains social change by identifying mechanisms for collective action which establish a normative vision that guides the evolution of the social system or group. In its essence, this theory suggests that social systems evolve toward the highest ideals held by the social group.
Notes
"PB98-151277." Caption title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 8-9).
Contents Notes
Appreciative inquiry explains social change by identifying mechanisms for collective action which establish a normative vision that guides the evolution of the social system of a group. In its essence this theory suggests that social systems evolve toward the highest ideals held by the social group. Systems that develop positive images of the other and heliotropic, or positive, reinforcement loops show how social change can be guided by affirmative images. Change in social systems must also follow success in competition during an evolutionary process which is guided by the Maximum Empower Principle. This principle states that system designs which maximize empower (emergy per unit time) production for the whole system are the ones that survive. Emergy normalizes the many kinds of energy flows in a hierarchical system to that they are expressed in equivalent units. We designed a simple experiment to determine if social systems with heliotropic loops generated more empower than systems without such interactions. We determined the empower production of six possible modes of interaction between two social groups competing for the same resource base by simulating six Energy System models, each representing a mode of social interaction. The cumulative empower produced by these models was compared to rank the interaction modes in order of their expected competitiveness in the evolutionary process. A path for the evolution of social systems where two groups compete for the same resources was proposed based on our simulation results. In general the three designs containing heliotropic loops generated more empower than the design with no social interaction and the two designs with negative social interactions.