Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 4 OF 7

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Measurement and Analysis of Unsaturated Flow and Groundwater Surface Profiles Related to Recharge and Withdrawals.
Author Evan, D. D. ; Matloc, W. G. ; Qash, H. K. ; Sumne, J. S. ; Warric, A. W. ;
CORP Author Arizona Univ., Tucson.
Year Published 1971
Report Number DI-14-31-0001-3203; OWRR-A-017-ARIZ; 01781,; A-017-ARIZ(1)
Stock Number PB-204 708
Additional Subjects ( Ground water ; Mathematical models) ; ( Ground water recharge ; Arizona) ; Fluid flow ; Water wells ; Water supply ; Hydrogeology ; Streams ; Volume ; Correlation techniques ; Aquifers ; Porosity ; Computer programs ; Permeability ; Water storage ; Water table ; Rillito Creek ; Unsaturated flow ; Tucson(Arizona) ; Ephemeral streams
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB-204 708 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 30p
Abstract
The relationship between time of flow in Rillito Creek, an ephemeral stream near Tucson, Arizona, and water levels in nearby wells was defined and a mathematical model of the underlying aquifer was formulated. A digital computer program was used to determine model parameter values which most closely duplicated measured groundwater surface profiles. Values obtained were: effective channel width, 150 feet; permeability, 0.0022 feet per sencond; porosity, 0.20; and infiltration, 3.8 feet per day. Computer water levels agreed closely with measured values for another recharge period. Field results show that the displacement of chloride applied in irrigation water can be quantitatively predicted by linking the equations of solute and water movement through an unsaturated soil. Geophysical methods were examined for determining groundwater volumes in alluvial basins and coefficients of storage. Correlation of gravity changes with coefficient of storage indicates that the gravity method may be used for aquifers which have high coefficients of storage and in which the water table rises or declines 20 feet or more. (Author)