Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 505 OF 1214

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Fate of Toxic and Hazardous Materials in the Air Environment.
Author Cupitt, Larry T. ;
CORP Author Environmental Sciences Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.
Year Published 1980
Report Number EPA-600/3-80-084;
Stock Number PB80-221948
Additional Subjects Hazardous materials ; Toxicology ; Photochemical reactions ; Reaction kinetics ; Scavenging ; Adsorption ; Dissolving ; Deposition ; Half life ; Toxic substances
Internet Access
Description Access URL
http://nepis.epa.gov/Exe/ZyPDF.cgi?Dockey=2000I8BH.PDF
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
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Status
NTIS  PB80-221948 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. NTIS 06/23/1988
Collation 35p
Abstract
The atmospheric fate of potentially toxic/hazardous chemicals currently undergoing assessment by EPA was evaluated. Both chemical and physical removal processes are discussed. Mathematical descriptions of physical removal mechanisms were developed and applied to specific chemicals, i.e., acrylonitrile, ethylene dichloride, perchloroethylene, vinylidene chloride and benzo(a)pyrene. Estimates of physical removal by rainfall suggest half-lives of 300 days or longer for these compounds. Calculations based on reported photo-decomposition rates of halomethanes in contact with silica surfaces (e.g., desert sands) suggest half-lives on the order of 25 years for such halogenated chemicals, and dry deposition of the other compounds of interest is probably equally slow. Adsorption on aerosol particles is a reasonable removal mechanism only for benzo(a)pyrene, and all physical removal processes are generally demonstrated to be rather inefficient. Forty-six individual materials were evaluated relative to their probable fates and tropospheric lifetimes. Known or theoretical rate constants are listed for reaction with hydroxyl radicals and ozone. The probability of photolysis and of physical removal was assessed, and residence lifetimes assigned. Probable products of tropospheric oxidation processes were also tabulated.