Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 10 OF 43

Main Title Dream catchers : how mainstream America discovered native spirituality /
Author Jenkins, Philip,
Publisher Oxford University Press,
Year Published 2004
OCLC Number 54074085
ISBN 0195161157; 9780195161151; 0195189108; 9780195189100
Subjects America--Religion ; Indians--Religion--Influence ; 1109 systematic religious studies: other--(NL-LeOCL)077593960 ; Spiritualit├Ąt ; Spiritualiteit ; Indianen ; Culturele invloeden ; Indianer ; USA
Internet Access
Description Access URL
Contributor biographical information http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0723/2003026909-b.html
Publisher description http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0614/2003026909-d.html
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
EHAM NAR NAR-66 Region 1 Library/Boston,MA 03/21/2020
Collation xii, 306 pages ; 24 cm
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (pages 257-298) and index.
Contents Notes
Haunting America -- Heathen darkness -- Discovering native religion, 1860-1920 -- Pilgrims from the vacuum, 1890-1920 -- Crisis in Red Atlantis, 1914-1925 -- Brave new worlds, 1925-1950 -- Before the new age, 1920-1960 -- Vision quests, 1960-1980 -- The medicine show -- Thinking tribal thoughts -- Returning the land -- Real religion? Jenkins offers an account of the changing mainstream attitudes towards Native American spirituality, once seen as degraded spectacle, now hailed as New Age salvation. He charts this remarkable change by highlighting the complex history of white American attitudes towards Native religions, considering everything from the 19th-century American obsession with "Hebrew Indians" and Lost Tribes, to the early 20th-century cult of the Maya as bearers of the wisdom of ancient Atlantis. He looks at the Carlos Castaneda books, the writings of Lynn Andrews and Frank Waters, and explores New Age paraphernalia including dream-catchers, crystals, medicine bags, and Native-themed Tarot cards. He also examines the controversial New Age appropriation of Native sacred places and notes that many "white indians" see mainstream society as religiously empty.--From publisher description.