Record Display for the EPA National Library Catalog

RECORD NUMBER: 31 OF 36

OLS Field Name OLS Field Data
Main Title Rotating Biological Contactors - Second Order Kinetics.
Author Opatken, Edward J. ;
CORP Author Municipal Environmental Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. Wastewater Research Div.
Year Published 1982
Report Number EPA-600/D-82-319;
Stock Number PB82-241902
Additional Subjects Sewage treatment ; Reaction kinetics ; Biochemical oxygen demand ; Rotating biological contactors ; Secondary sewage treatment
Holdings
Library Call Number Additional Info Location Last
Modified
Checkout
Status
NTIS  PB82-241902 Most EPA libraries have a fiche copy filed under the call number shown. Check with individual libraries about paper copy. 06/23/1988
Collation 25p
Abstract
Rotating biological contactors (RBC) have been employed for treating municipal wastewaters within the United States since 1970. The RBC process lends itself to kinetic interpretation because of the sequential stages employed in the operation. This mode of operation enables the substrate concentration to be determined after various time intervals to obtain kinetic data for interpretation. An analysis was conducted on previously published data, which contained the concentration of soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) at various stages in the treatment train. The time intervals were calculated based on the hydraulic loading rate and the liquid volume in each stage. The data was incorporated into a number of rate equations and a second order reaction rate equation gave a good correlation for the published data. This technique was repeated with other published data on the disappearance of sCOD at different stages in the treatment train and again the data obeyed a second order rate equation. A project was initiated to obtain interstage data on soluble COD at three RBC facilities within a 100-mile radius of Cincinnati. The results again gave a strong correlation that RBC obey a second order reaction rate equation. The analytical results from nine RBC plants were compared with the predicted interstage data determined by using a second order rate equation. The results showed that second order kinetics was able to predict interstage soluble organic data at eight of the nine plants.