EPA Science Inventory

FUGACITY-BASED INDOOR RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE FATE MODEL

Citation:

Bennett, D. H. AND E J. Furtaw Jr. FUGACITY-BASED INDOOR RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE FATE MODEL. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 38(7):2142-2152, (2004).

Impact/Purpose:

Research will be conducted to develop and apply integrated microenvironmental, and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) exposure-dose models and methods (that account for all media, routes, pathways and endpoints). Specific efforts will focus on the following areas:

1) Develop the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) System.

Includes: Updating the subsystems and compartments of the ERDEM models with those features needed for modeling chemicals of interest to risk assessors;

Designing and implementing the graphical user interface for added features.

Refining the exposure interface to handle various sources of exposure information;

Providing tools for post processing as well as for uncertainty and variability analyses;

Research on numerical and symbolic mathematical/statistical solution methods and computational algorithms/software for deterministic and stochastic systems analysis.

2) Apply ERDEM and other quantitative models to understand pharmacokinetics (PK) and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the dosimetry of specific compounds of regulatory interest.

Examples of the applications are:

exposure of children to pesticides

study design

route-to-route extrapolation

species extrapolation

experimental data analysis

relationship between parametric uncertainty and the distribution of model results

validity of scaling methods within species

validity of scaling methods from one species to another species

reduction of uncertainty factors for risk assessment

Description:

Dermal and non-dietary pathways are possibly important for exposure to pesticides used in residences. Limited data have been collected on pesticide concentrations in residential air and surfaces following application. Models may be useful for interpreting these data and to make predictions about concentrations in the home for other pesticides based on chemical properties. We present a dynamic mass-balance compartment model based on fugacity principles. The model includes air (both gas phase and aerosols), carpet, smooth flooring, and walls as model compartments. Six size fractions of particulate matter with different fate and transport properties are included. We determine the compartmental fugacity capacity and mass-transfer rate coefficients between compartments. We compare model results to chlorpyrifos air and carpet measurements from an independent study. For a comparison, we run the same simulation for diazinon and permethrin. We quantify the effect of parameter uncertainty and model uncertainties related to the source release rate and conduct a sensitivity analysis to determine which parameters contribute most to output uncertainty. In the model comparison to chlorpyrifos measurements, the model results are of the same order of magnitude as measured values, but tend to overpredict the measured data, thus indicating the need for a better understanding of emissions from treated surfaces.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development partially funded and collaborated in the research descrived here under assistance agreement number DW-988-38190-01-0 to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 02/28/2004
Record Last Revised: 07/25/2008
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 85595

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN EXPOSURE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DIVISION

EXPOSURE & DOSE RESEARCH BRANCH