Science Inventory

HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT MAY LEAD TO HIGH INHALED INTAKE DOSES IN CHILDREN AGED 6-13

Citation:

McCurdy, T R. HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT MAY LEAD TO HIGH INHALED INTAKE DOSES IN CHILDREN AGED 6-13. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 4(3-4):251-260, (1997).

Impact/Purpose:

The two main objectives of this research are (1) to improve and update and (2) to analyze the CHAD database.

For objective 1, we will

* Reconfigure the CHAD program into a completely modularized Oracle database.

* Redesign User Interface for effcient utilization of the program's capability.

* Obtain dates for those surveys that did not provide them to us, so that we can obtain associated meteorological/climatic inputs for the person-days of information without them.

* Revise the upper and lower bound delimiters in the energy expenditure distributions used for activity-specific estimates.

For objective 2, we will

* Evaluate data quality.

* Evaluate trends and activities for various subgroups.

* Identify temporal patterns for longitudinal data.

* Characterize resolution required for output for exposure and dose models.

Description:

The paper focuses on possible activities of children aged 6-13 that may make them susceptible to high hourly intake doses of ozone (O3) air pollution. Data from an O3 exposure modeling exercise indicates that a relatively few hours can account for a significant amount of the total cumulative ozone intake dose (DIT) received in a year. While O3 concentration levels affected the hourly intake dose (DIh) more than breathing rate (E), there was a distinct and significant relationship between E and DIh when hours in a year were stratified by concentration levels. By investigating the E levels associated with high dose hours, it appears that activities with a hourly E rate of between 25 and 45 L min-1 can lead to high intake doses of O3. The exercise literature was reviewed to ascertain which activities could lead to that range of E's and be sustained by children for an hour. A list of such activities was developed. If an analyst is interested only in modeling high DIh hours for children 6-13, an efficient approach might be to focus on those activities and estimate DIT for the other hours in an aggregated manner.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT ( JOURNAL/ PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 12/31/1997
Record Last Revised: 12/22/2005
Record ID: 65485