EPA Science Inventory

Study of Disinfectant Penetration in a Drinking Water Storage Tank Sediment Using Microelectrodes- Indianapolis

Citation:

Liu, H., D. Wahman, AND J. Pressman. Study of Disinfectant Penetration in a Drinking Water Storage Tank Sediment Using Microelectrodes- Indianapolis. In Proceedings, 2016 WQTC, Indianapolis, IN, November 14 - 17, 2016. AWWA Research Foundation, Denver, CO, 99-99, (2016).

Description:

Sediment accumulation in water storage facilities causes water quality degradation issues, including enhanced biological growth and more rapid disinfectant decay. For chloramine systems, sediment may harbor nitrifying bacteria, feeding on ammonia from monochloramine decay and demand. The microbial growth and disinfectant penetration water quality reactions within water storage sediments are largely uncharacterized. Therefore, the use of microelectrodes, which have contributed to a greater understanding of biological mechanisms in biofilm and sediments for decades, is a perfect application to elucidate the water quality changes within the tank sediments. Microelectrodes can measure in situ chemical and physical variables within those microenvironments with little interference from other factors and with high spatial resolution. The study goals were to evaluate a drinking water storage facility’s sediment exposed to chloramine by fabricating microelectrodes for time-dependent concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, monochloramine, ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate in the sediment.

Purpose/Objective:

Sediment accumulation in water storage facilities causes water quality degradation issues, including enhanced biological growth and more rapid disinfectant decay. For chloramine systems, sediment may harbor nitrifying bacteria, feeding on ammonia from monochloramine decay and demand. The microbial growth and disinfectant penetration water quality reactions within water storage sediments are largely uncharacterized. Therefore, the use of microelectrodes, which have contributed to a greater understanding of biological mechanisms in biofilm and sediments for decades, is a perfect application to elucidate the water quality changes within the tank sediments. Microelectrodes can measure in situ chemical and physical variables within those microenvironments with little interference from other factors and with high spatial resolution. The study goals were to evaluate a drinking water storage facility’s sediment exposed to chloramine by fabricating microelectrodes for time-dependent concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, monochloramine, ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate in the sediment.

URLs/Downloads:

508 2016 WQTC (STORAGE TANK).PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 993.146 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PAPER IN NON-EPA PROCEEDINGS)
Start Date: 11/17/2016
Completion Date: 11/17/2016
Record Last Revised: 03/29/2018
Record Created: 02/14/2018
Record Released: 02/14/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 339683

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION BRANCH