Science Inventory

Overview and Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System Version 5.2

Citation:

Appel, W., S. Napelenok, C. Hogrefe, G. Pouliot, K. Foley, S. Roselle, Jon Pleim, J. Bash, H. Pye, N. Heath, B. Murphy, AND R. Mathur. Overview and Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System Version 5.2. Chapter 11, Air Pollution Modeling and its Application XXV. Springer International Publishing AG, Cham (ZG), Switzerland, , 69-73, (2017).

Impact/Purpose:

This Work is a collection of selected papers presented at the 35th International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and its Application, held in Chania (Crete), Greece, Oct 3-7, 2016. Current developments in air pollution modelling are explored as a series of contributions from researchers at the forefront of their field. This newest contribution on air pollution modelling and its application is focused on local, urban, regional and intercontinental modelling; long term modelling and trend analysis; data assimilation and air quality forecasting; model assessment and evaluation; aerosol transformation. Additionally, this work also examines the relationship between air quality and human health and the effects of climate change on air quality.

Description:

A new version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, version 5.2 (CMAQv5.2), is currently being developed, with a planned release date in 2017. The new model includes numerous updates from the previous version of the model (CMAQv5.1). Specific updates include a new windblown dust scheme; updates to the organic aerosol treatment; updates to the atmospheric chemistry, including the Carbon-Bond 6 chemical mechanism; and various updates to the cloud treatment in the model. In addition, a new lightning assimilation scheme has been implemented in WRF, the meteorological driver for the CMAQ simulations, which greatly improves the placement and intensity of precipitation, which in turn results in improved CMAQ performance. Comparisons between CMAQv5.1 and v5.2 show that ozone (O3) mixing ratios generally increase in the summer with CMAQv5.2, which results in increased bias, while fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations also increase in the summer, which results in decreased bias.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57645-9_11   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (BOOK CHAPTER)
Product Published Date: 10/15/2017
Record Last Revised: 09/29/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 337756

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

COMPUTATIONAL EXPOSURE DIVISION