EPA Science Inventory

Associations between anti-cytomegalovirus IgG responses and health effect biomarkers

Citation:

Styles, J., A. Egorov, R. Converse, S. Griffin, E. Klein, E. Sams, AND Tim Wade. Associations between anti-cytomegalovirus IgG responses and health effect biomarkers. Society for Epidemiologic Research annual meeting, Seattle, WA, June 20 - 23, 2017.

Description:

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the herpes simplex virus family that infects approximately 50% of US adults. HCMV is transmitted from person to person through bodily fluids, congenitally or from donors to transplant recipients. It causes a lifelong latent infection that can be reactivated when immune function is reduced. Infection has been linked with cardiovascular disease, cancer, early immunosenescence and premature mortality in immunocompetent individuals. The aim of this project was to assess associations between anti-HCMV IgG antibody responses and biomarkers of neuroendocrine, immune and metabolic functions. The study used archived serum samples and questionnaire data collected from 307 adults living in the Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina area as part of a cross-sectional study of environmental risk factors of selected chronic infections. Serum samples were tested using commercially available kits for anti-HCMV IgG antibodies, pro-inflammatory cytokines, vascular injury and inflammation biomarkers and catecholamines. Results demonstrate that 50 % of study participants were HCMV seropositive. Predictors of HCMV seropositivity included age, racial and ethnic minority status, female sex, low education, body mass index and smoking. Preliminary results suggest that HCMV seropositivity was associated with 22% (95% CL 3%; 37%) lower adjusted median level of serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). In HCMV seropositive individuals, an inter-quartile range increase in intensity of the anti-HCMV IgG antibody response was associated with 11% (1%; 20%) lower adjusted level of interleukin-8, and 32% (2%; 70%) and 17% (2%; 35%) higher levels of serum amyloid-A and epinephrine. These results are consistent with previous studies showing HCMV reactivation linked with levels of interleukins, catecholamines and DHEA, and suggesting potential mechanisms of long-term health effects of HCMV in immunocompetent adults. This abstract does not represent EPA policy.

Purpose/Objective:

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a very common chronic infection with substantial public health impacts. While latent infections usually appear asymptomatic, recent studies demonstrated long-term health consequences including accelerated aging of the immune system, cardiovascular diseases and increased risk of premature death. Individual and community level socioeconomic factors are associated with prevalence rates of HCMV infections. This exploratory research project utilized left-over samples from previously conducted NHEERL studies to assess predictors of infection in the Durham-Chapel Hill area and to explore potential associations between seropositivity and intensity of IgG antibody response to cytomegalovirus in infected individuals with biomarkers of inflammation, vascular injury and neuroendocrine function. This research was conducted under the HSC program. Its results contribute to understanding the mechanisms of long-term detrimental effects of latent HCMV infections and highlight socioeconomic inequalities in infection rates.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/POSTER)
Completion Date: 06/22/2017
Record Last Revised: 08/16/2017
Record Created: 08/16/2017
Record Released: 08/16/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 337253

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH