Science Inventory

Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

Citation:

Ng, N., S. Brown, A. Archibald, E. Atlas, R. Cohen, J. Crowley, D. Day, N. Donahue, J. Fry, H. Fuchs, R. Griffin, M. Guzman, H. Herrmann, A. Hodzic, Y. Iinuma, J. Jimenez, A. Kiendler-Scharr, B. Lee, D. Luecken, J. Mao, R. McLaren, A. Mutzel, H. Osthoff, B. Ouyang, B. Picquet-Varrault, U. Platt, H. Pye, Y. Rudich, R. Schwantes, M. Shiraiwa, J. Stutz, J. Thornton, A. Tilgner, B. Williams, AND R. Zaveri. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Copernicus Publications, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, 17:2103-2162, (2017).

Impact/Purpose:

Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

Description:

Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/17/2103/2017/acp-17-2103-2017.html   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 02/13/2017
Record Last Revised: 05/17/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 336508

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

COMPUTATIONAL EXPOSURE DIVISION