Science Inventory

On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates Parameterization of Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ

Citation:

Kang, D., N. Heath, K. Foley, J. Bash, S. Roselle, AND R. Mathur. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates Parameterization of Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ. ITM 2016: 35th International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, Crete, GREECE, October 03 - 07, 2016.

Impact/Purpose:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, process models, and decision support tools for use both within and outside of EPA.

Description:

Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past decade, considerable uncertainties still exist with the quantification of lightning NOX production and distribution in the troposphere. It is even more challenging for regional chemistry and transport models to accurately parameterize lightning NOX production and distribution in time and space. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) parameterizes the lightning NO emissions using local scaling factors adjusted by the convective precipitation rate that is predicted by the upstream meteorological model; the adjustment is based on the observed lightning strikes from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). For this parameterization to be valid, the existence of an a priori reasonable relationship between the observed lightning strikes and the modeled convective precipitation rates is needed. In this study, we will present an analysis leveraged on the observed NLDN lightning strikes and CMAQ model simulations over the continental United States for a time period spanning over a decade. Based on the analysis, new parameterization scheme for lightning NOX will be proposed and the results will be evaluated. The proposed scheme will be beneficial to modeling exercises where the observed lightning strikes are not generally available, such as air quality forecasts. Preliminary results show distinctive spatial patterns for the relationship between observed lightning strikes and modeled convective precipitation rates over the continental United States suggests that a reasonable parameterization for the lightning NOX production and distribution for use in regional air quality models can be developed.

URLs/Downloads:

https://itm.marvin.vito.be/   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 10/07/2016
Record Last Revised: 02/24/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 335478

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

COMPUTATIONAL EXPOSURE DIVISION