Science Inventory

Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated buildings based on wind tunnel simulations

Citation:

Perry, S., D. Heist, L. Brouwer, E. Monbureau, AND L. Brixey. Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated buildings based on wind tunnel simulations. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 142:286-295, (2016).

Impact/Purpose:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, process models, and decision support tools for use both within and outside of EPA.

Description:

This paper presents a wind tunnel study of the effects of elongated rectangular buildings on the dispersion of pollutants from nearby stacks. The study examines the influence of source location, building aspect ratio, and wind direction on pollutant dispersion with the goal of developing improved algorithms within dispersion models. The paper also examines the current AERMOD/PRIME modeling capabilities compared to wind tunnel observations. Differences in the amount of plume material entrained in the wake region downwind of a building for various source locations and source heights are illustrated with vertical and lateral concentration profiles. These profiles were parameterized using the Gaussian equation and show the influence of building/source configurations on those parameters. When the building is oriented at 45° to the approach flow, for example, the effective plume height descends more rapidly than it does for a perpendicular building, enhancing the resulting surface concentrations in the wake region. Buildings at angles to the wind cause a cross-wind shift in the location of the plume resulting from a lateral mean flow established in the building wake. These and other effects that are not well represented in many dispersion models are important considerations when developing improved algorithms to estimate the location and magnitude of concentrations downwind of elongated buildings.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231016305829   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 10/03/2016
Record Last Revised: 10/07/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 325290

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

COMPUTATIONAL EXPOSURE DIVISION