Science Inventory

Short-term effects of air temperature on plasma metabolite concentrations in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

Citation:

Hampel, R., S. Breitner, W. Kraus, E. Hauser, S. Shah, C. Ward-Caviness, R. Devlin, D. Diaz-Sanchez, L. Neas, W. Cascio, A. Peters, AND A. Schneider. Short-term effects of air temperature on plasma metabolite concentrations in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH. Academic Press Incorporated, Orlando, FL, 151:224-232, (2016).

Impact/Purpose:

This study examines a susceptible population of individuals, the CATHGEN cohort ,undergoing cardiac catheterization, to assess the influence of air temperature on selected metabolites and to determine whether the resultant associations are modified by participant or life style characteristics. Metabolic profiling has received little attention in environmental epidemiology. We observed multiple associations between air temperature on metabolites thought to be involved in cardiovascular disease. Though many of these associations are modest in magnitude, the ubiquitous nature of ambient temperature exposure means that small increases in risk factors may have profound effects on disease at the population level. Moreover, our findings may help to understand the link between air temperature and cardiovascular disease but further work is required in this area.

Description:

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown associations between air temperature and cardiovascular health outcomes. Metabolic dysregulation might also play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.OBJECTIVES: To investigate short-term temperature effects on metabolites related to cardiovascular disease.METHODS: Concentrations of 45 acylcarnitines, 15 amino acids, ketone bodies and total free fatty acids were available in 2869 participants from the CATHeterization GENetics cohort recruited at the Duke University Cardiac Catheterization Clinic (Durham, NC) between 2001 and 2007. Ten metabolites were selected based on quality criteria and cluster analysis. Daily averages of meteorological variables were obtained from the North American Regional Reanalysis project. Immediate, lagged, and cumulative temperature effects on metabolite concentrations were analyzed using (piecewise) linear regression models.RESULTS: Linear temperature effects were found for glycine, C16-0H: C14:1-DC, and aspartic acid/asparagine. A 5°C increase in temperature was associated with a 1.8% [95%-confidence interval: 0.3%; 3.3%) increase in glycine (5-day average), a 3.2% [0.1%; 6.3%] increase in C16- 0H:C14:1-DC (lag of four days), and a -1.4% [-2.4%; -0.3%) decrease in aspart ic acid/asparagine (lag of two days). Non-linear temperature effects were observed for alanineAnd total ketone bodies with breakpoint of 4°C and 20°C, respectively. Both a 5°C decrease in temperature on colder days (<4°C)and a 5°C increase in temperature on warmer days ( ≥4°C) were associated with a four day delayed increase in alanine by 6.6% [11.7; 1.8%] and 1.9% [0.3%; 3.4%], respectively. For ketone bodies we found immediate (0-day lag) increases of 4.2% [-0.5%; 9.1%] and 12.3% [0.1%; 26.0%) associated with 5°C decreases on colder (<20°C) days and 5°C increases on warmer days (≥20°C), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: We observed multiple effects of air temperature on metabolites several of which are reported to be involved in cardiovascular disease. Our findings might help to understand the link between air temperature and cardiovascular disease.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2016.07.010   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 11/01/2016
Record Last Revised: 11/21/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 324256

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

CLINICAL RESEARCH BRANCH