EPA Science Inventory

Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity?

Citation:

Lichtveld, K., J. Clinger, K. Thomas, AND N. Tulve. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity? NEHA 2016 AEC and HUD Health Homes Conference, San Antonio, TX, June 13 - 16, 2016.

Description:

Background: Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-chemical stressors found in a child’s total environment (built, natural, social environments) and how these cumulative interactions affect childhood obesity. Objectives: The objectives of this research were to (1) Identify and characterize chemical and non-chemical stressors that impact childhood obesity (2) Conduct a meta-analysis of selected stressors and inherent factors identified in objective 1.Methods: A state-of-the-science literature review was conducted to identify, organize, and analyze the chemical and non-chemical stressors related to childhood obesity. Examples of non-chemical stressors from the built environment include access to fast food restaurants, convenience stores, and recreational facilities. Examples of non-chemical stressors from the social environment include television watching, interactions with peers, school success, crime, violence in the home and socioeconomic status. Examples of chemical stressors include bisphenol A, metals, pesticides, flame retardants, and air pollution. Available data was extracted from the literature, inputted into a searchable database, and analyzed. A meta-analysis was conducted to identify the direction and magnitude of the effects of the stressors on childhood obesity.Results: Preliminary analyses of the built environment data suggested no association between the distance a child lives from a school and a child’s weight. Other preliminary analyses of selected stressors showed inconsistent associations between the stressor (e.g., access to fast food restaurants, pesticides, metals) and a child’s weight. Further analyses of the available chemical and non-chemical stressors will be presented. Conclusions: This research suggests the importance of considering the cumulative effects of chemical and non-chemical stressors found in a child’s total environment on childhood obesity.

Purpose/Objective:

Presented at NEHA 2016 AEC and HUD Health Homes Conference

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.neha.org/news-events/aec-and-hud-healthy-homes-conference   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/POSTER)
Completion Date: 06/16/2016
Record Last Revised: 08/01/2016
Record Created: 08/01/2016
Record Released: 08/01/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 322591

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

SYSTEMS EXPOSURE DIVISION