Science Inventory

Using Extractive FTIR to Measure N2O from Medium Heavy Duty Vehicles Powered with Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

Citation:

Thompson, E., R. Baldauf, R. Snow, T. Long, J. Faircloth, AND C. Hayes. Using Extractive FTIR to Measure N2O from Medium Heavy Duty Vehicles Powered with Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels. A&WMA, Raleigh, NC, June 23, 2015 - February 25, 2016.

Impact/Purpose:

A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to measure N2O and other pollutant gases during an evaluation of two medium heavy-duty diesel trucks equipped with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). The emissions of these trucks were characterized under a variety of operating conditions as well as environmental conditions. One vehicle used a NOx absorber catalyst and the other used a Selective catalytic Reduction system for control of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Both vehicles were tested with two different fuels [ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel (B20)] and ambient temperatures (70oF and 20oF), while the truck with the NOx absorber was also operated at two loads (a heavy and light weight). Three driving cycles provided emissions estimates under changing operating conditions: 1) a cold start with low transients (CSLT), 2) the federal heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), and 3) a warm start with low transients (WSLT). Emission rates were compared between the two vehicles operating under different modes (cold start, ambient cycle and drive cycle). Emissions from the two NOx control technologies were also compared.

Description:

A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to measure N2O and other pollutant gases during an evaluation of two medium heavy-duty diesel trucks equipped with a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). The emissions of these trucks were characterized under a variety of operating conditions as well as environmental conditions. One vehicle used a NOx absorber catalyst and the other used a Selective catalytic Reduction system for control of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Both vehicles were tested with two different fuels [ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel (B20)] and ambient temperatures (70oF and 20oF), while the truck with the NOx absorber was also operated at two loads (a heavy and light weight). Three driving cycles provided emissions estimates under changing operating conditions: 1) a cold start with low transients (CSLT), 2) the federal heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), and 3) a warm start with low transients (WSLT). Emission rates were compared between the two vehicles operating under different modes (cold start, ambient cycle and drive cycle). Emissions from the two NOx control technologies were also compared.

URLs/Downloads:

2015AWMA_ABSTRACT_1.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 37.813 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 06/25/2015
Record Last Revised: 02/16/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 311193

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION

EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION AND PREVENTION BRANCH