Science Inventory

Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers

Citation:

Tong, H., A. Rappold, M. Caughey, A. Hinderliter, M. Bassett, T. Montilla, M. Case, J. Berntsen, P. Bromberg, W. Cascio, D. Diaz-Sanchez, R. Devlin, AND J. Samet. Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC, 123(11):1173-9, (2015).

Impact/Purpose:

This journal article demonstrated a mitigation strategy to protect against the adverse health effect from ambient particulte matter exposure in healthy adults.

Description:

Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the efficacy of OO and FO in mitigating endothelial dysfunction and disruption of hemostasis caused by exposure to particulate matter (PM). Methods and Results: Forty-two participants (58±1 year old) received either 3 g/day of OO, FO, or no supplements (naive) for 4 weeks prior to undergoing 2-hr exposures to filtered air and concentrated ambient particulate matter (CAP; mean 253±16 µg/m3). Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery pre-exposure, immediately post-exposure, and 20 hrs post-exposure. Levels of endothelin-1 and markers of fibrinolysis and inflammation were also measured. The FMD was significantly lower after CAP exposure in the naive (-19.4%;95% CI: -36.4, -2.3 per 100 µg/m3 CAP relative to baseline; p=0.03) and FO groups (-13.7%; 95% CI:-24.5, -2.9; p=0.01), but not in the OO group (-7.6%; 95% CI: -21.5 6.3; p=0.27). Tissue plasminogen activator levels were significantly increased immediately after (11.6%, 95% CI: 0.8, 22.2; p=0.04) and 20 hrs after CAP exposure in the OO group. Endothelin-1 levels were significantly increased 20 hr after CAP exposure in the naïve group only (17.1%; 95% CI: 2.2, 32.0; p=0.03). Conclusion: Short-term exposure to CAP induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. OO supplementation attenuated CAP-induced reduction of FMD and changes in blood markers associated with vasoconstriction and fibrinolysis, suggesting that OO supplementation may be an efficacious intervention to protect against vascular effects of exposure to PM.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408988   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 11/30/2015
Record Last Revised: 11/27/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 310854

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

CLINICAL RESEARCH BRANCH