EPA Science Inventory

Remediation, restoration, revitalization (R2R2R): How Great Lakes communities benefit from AOC delisting

Citation:

Hoffman, J., M. Sierszen, T. Angradi, AND Dave Bolgrien. Remediation, restoration, revitalization (R2R2R): How Great Lakes communities benefit from AOC delisting. Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference, Toledo, OH, March 11 - 12, 2015.

Description:

Throughout the Great Lakes, remediation and restoration activities in areas of concern (AOC) are providing economic and social benefits (“revitalization”) to coastal communities. However, there is a general lack of documentation and evaluation of benefits that have come from remediation and restoration, even in those cases where revitalization was apparent and economic gains were predicted. To promote more deliberate, cost-effective, and sustainable revitalization outcomes from remediation and restoration, a joint EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) workshop was held to review existing case studies to better understand the ways communities are benefitting from AOC remediation and restoration efforts. In this talk, the major findings of the workshop will be presented. We conclude that developing metrics and indicators of ecosystem services and community benefits provided by improved environmental quality in Areas of Concern will yield substantial new information on the benefits received by communities from R2R2R projects, as well as insights on how to improve restoration, remediation and revitalization efforts in Great Lakes Areas of Con

Purpose/Objective:

not applicable

URLs/Downloads:

HOFFMAN ABSTRACT.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 133.966 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Completion Date: 03/12/2015
Record Last Revised: 03/31/2015
Record Created: 03/31/2015
Record Released: 03/31/2015
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 307457

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

MID-CONTINENT ECOLOGY DIVISION