EPA Science Inventory

Molecular detection of Campylobacter spp. and fecal indicator bacteria during the northern migration of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Central Platte River

Citation:

Lu, J., H. Ryu, J. Vogel, J. Santodomingo, AND N. ASHBOLT. Molecular detection of Campylobacter spp. and fecal indicator bacteria during the northern migration of Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Central Platte River. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC, 79(12):3762-3769, (2013).

Description:

The annual Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) migration through Nebraska is thought to be a major source of fecal pollution to the Platte River, but of unknown human health risk. To better understand potential risks, the presence of Campylobacter species and fecal bacteria were examined in crane excreta and water samples collected during their stopover in the Platte River (January to May, 2010). Genus-specific PCR assays and sequence analyses suggested that C. jejuni was the predominant species in Sandhill cane excreta. Campylobacter spp. was detected in 48% of crane excreta, 24% of water samples and 11% of sediment samples. The excreta samples contained highest level of Enterococcus spp. (mean 4.6×108 cell equivalent (CE)/g), while water samples contained highest level of E. coli (mean 1.4×106 CE/100 mL). The mean estimates of all the four bacterial groups detected were generally higher during the north migration via the Platte River than before the birds roosted and after the birds left the area. Enterococcus spp. densities in sediments (i.e., 3.3×105 CE/g) were 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than Bacteroidetes spp. (4.9×103 CE/g), E. coli (2.2×103 CE/g), and Campylobacter spp. (37 CE/g). The highest bacterial estimates in the sediments were also associated with the cranes’ presence. Data based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and species-specific PCR assays indicated that C. jejuni was present in water, sediments and excreta as a result of Sandhill crane and Snow geese activity, and that their co-migration resulted in significant, but temporary change in water quality, during which there may be a C. jejuni health hazard in water and crops visited by the migrating birds.

Purpose/Objective:

The main objective of this study was to determine the occurrence and quantity of Campylobacter species and fecal indicators in the excreta of Sandhill cranes roosting along the Platte River, and stream water and sediments from the major roosting zone. This information is not only to inform managers on FIB impacts, but also provides data to allow the development of quantitative microbial risk assessment models.

URLs/Downloads:

AEM.03990-12   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 08/02/2013
Completion Date: 08/02/2013
Record Last Revised: 01/30/2014
Record Created: 08/02/2013
Record Released: 08/02/2013
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 258394

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LAB

MICROBIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT DIVISION

BIOHAZARD ASSESSMENT RESEARCH BRANCH