Science Inventory

Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII): Advancing State of the Science in Regional Photochemical Modeling and Its Applications

Citation:

RAO, S. T., S. Galmarini, AND K. Puckett. Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII): Advancing State of the Science in Regional Photochemical Modeling and Its Applications. BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY. American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA, 92(1):23-30, (2011).

Impact/Purpose:

The National Exposure Research Laboratory′s (NERL′s) Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA′s mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD′s research program is engaged in developing and evaluating predictive atmospheric models on all spatial and temporal scales for forecasting the Nation′s air quality and for assessing changes in air quality and air pollutant exposures, as affected by changes in ecosystem management and regulatory decisions. AMAD is responsible for providing a sound scientific and technical basis for regulatory policies based on air quality models to improve ambient air quality. The models developed by AMAD are being used by EPA, NOAA, and the air pollution community in understanding and forecasting not only the magnitude of the air pollution problem, but also in developing emission control policies and regulations for air quality improvements.

Description:

Although the focus in the 1970s was primarily on urban air pollution models, it is well known that pollution problems such as acid rain, ozone, and fine particulate matter are regional in scope, requiring regional-scale multipollutant models. In North America and Europe, several models have been developed by different research groups. These models have undergone extensive development during the last three decades worldwide because of the increased concern regarding the impacts of atmospheric pollution on human health and sensitive ecosystems. For example, during the 1980s, regional-scale acidic deposition models were developed in Europe, Canada, and the United States. Within the framework of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), a number of groups from government, industry, and academia were involved in addressing the so-called acid rain problem in the United States. Regional air-quality models are now being widely used in North America and Europe for understanding the complex interactions between meteorology and atmospheric chemistry, and pollutant transport and fate. Regional models are also playing an important role in developing emission-control policies to comply with the relevant standards for ozone and fine particles, forecasting air quality, and designing ambient monitoring strategies.

URLs/Downloads:

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society   Exit

Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII): Advancing State of the Science in Regional Photochemical Modeling and Its Applications   (PDF,NA pp, 452 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 01/01/2011
Record Last Revised: 03/02/2011
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 221463

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

ATMOSPHERIC MODELING AND ANALYSIS DIVISION

IMMEDIATE OFFICE