EPA Science Inventory

A-Salivary antibody responses as an indicator of waterborne infections: Pilot community study before and after installation of UV treatment

Citation:

EGOROV, A., S. GRIFFIN, AND T. J. WADE. A-Salivary antibody responses as an indicator of waterborne infections: Pilot community study before and after installation of UV treatment. Presented at International Society of Exposure Science, Minneapolis, MN, November 01 - 05, 2009.

Description:

This ongoing project involves the development, validation and pilot application of a multiplex immunoassay based on Luminex microsphere technology to measure salivary antibody responses to the potentially-waterborne pathogens, noroviruses (Norwalk, VA387 and VA207), rotaviruses, Cryptosporidium, H. pylori and T gondii. This salivary immunoassay has been validated for the detection ofprevalent chronic infections, H. pylori and T gondii, using diagnostic ELISA tests ofpaired serum samples. Validation ofimmunoconversion tests for the detection of incident acute infections involved an analysis of prospectively collected saliva samples from a Norwalk virus challenge study. These samples were tested repeatedly using various sample pre-treatment methods and assay buffers. Different immunoconversion definitions based on the ratio of antibody responses to the recombinant viral protein and internal cross-reactivity control, and the ratio of specific and total antibody concentrations were also evaluated in order to optimize the specificity and sensitivity of the assay. An optimized immunoconversion test is currently being applied in the ongoing analysis of saliva samples from a prospective pilot epidemiological study of waterborne infections. This study included two cohorts, before and after the introduction of UV treatment, in a community that used microbiologically-contaminated river as its source of drinking water. A total ofmore than 10,000 monthly saliva samples were collected from nearly 3,000 individuals participating in the two study cohorts. Preliminary results show that more than 10% ofindividuals with diarrhea or vomiting during follow-up had immunoconverted to noroviruses. This analysis is expected to be completed in 2010. Further development of the salivary antibody method will involve expansion of this multiplex assay to include more waterborne pathogens and more assay validation efforts. This abstract does not necessarily reflect Us. EPA policy.

Purpose/Objective:

Pilot Community Study

URLs/Downloads:

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Projected Completion Date: 11/01/2009
Record Last Revised: 11/24/2009
Record Created: 07/25/2009
Record Released: 07/25/2009
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 211990

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LAB

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH