Science Inventory

When Are Native Species Inappropriate for Conservation Plantings

Citation:

Ganguli, A. C., D. M. Engle, P. M. MAYER, AND S. D. Fuhlendorf. When Are Native Species Inappropriate for Conservation Plantings. Rangelands. Society for Range Management, Wheat Ridge, CO, 30(6):27-32, (2008).

Impact/Purpose:

To recommend evaluating the invasive potential of all species proposed for use in conservation programs and to present a conceptual framework for such an assessment.

Description:

Conservation agencies and organizations are generally reluctant to encourage the use of invasive plant species in conservation programs. Harsh lessons learned in the past have resulted in tougher screening protocols for non-indigenous species introductions and removal of many non-indigenous invaders from planting programs worldwide. Although the focus of screening and risk assessment programs has traditionally been on non-indigenous species, we present an example of a rapidly expanding native tree, eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), widely used in planting programs throughout the United States that should be screened for invasive potential. Intentional planting of eastern redcedar and fire suppression have converted many native grasslands to eastern redcedar woodlands. We recommend evaluating the invasive potential of all species proposed for use in conservation programs and we present a conceptual framework for such an assessment.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 12/05/2008
Record Last Revised: 06/04/2009
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 190532

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

GROUND WATER AND ECOSYSTEMS RESTORATION DIVISION

ECOSYSTEM & SUBSURFACE PROTECTION BRANCH