EPA Science Inventory

LEACHING OF CCA-TREATED WOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

Citation:

Townsend, T. G., T. Tolaymat, H. SoloGabriele, B. Dubey, AND L. Wadanambi. LEACHING OF CCA-TREATED WOOD: IMPLICATIONS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL. M.F. Fingas, C.D. Shackelford, G. Lyberatos, J. H. Tay (ed.), JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science BV, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 114(1-3):75-91, (2004).

Description:

Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), extraction procedure toxicity method (EPTOX), waste extraction test (WET), multiple extraction procedure (MEP), and modifications of these procedures which utilized actual MSW landfill leachates, a C&D leachate, and a concrete enhanced leachate. Additional experiments were conducted to assess factors affecting leaching, such as particle size, pH, and leaching contact time. Results from the regulatory leaching tests provided similar results with the exception of the WET, which extracted greater quantities of metals. Experiments conducted using actual MSW leachate, C&D leachate, and concrete enhanced leachate provided results that were within the same order of magnitude as results obtained from TCLP, SPLP, and EPTOX. Eleven of 13 samples of CCA-treated dimensional lumbar exceeded the U.S. EPA's toxicity characteristic (TC) threshold for arsenic (5 mg/L). If un-weathered arsenic-treated wood were not otherwise excluded from the definition of hazardous waste, it frequently would require management as such. When extracted with simulated rainwater (SPLP), 9 of 13 samples leached arsenic at concentrations above 5 mg/L. Metal leachability tended to increase with decreasing particle size and at pH extremes. All three metals leached above the drinking water standards thus possibly posing a potential risk to groundwater contamination. Arsenic is a major concern from a disposal point of view with respect to groundwater quality.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Start Date: 10/18/2004
Completion Date: 10/18/2004
Record Last Revised: 11/10/2005
Record Created: 12/08/2004
Record Released: 12/08/2004
Record ID: 104746

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION

WASTE MANAGEMENT BRANCH