Office of Research and Development Publications

Phosphate Treatment of Lead-Contaminated Soil: Effects on Water Quality, Plant Uptake, and Lead Speciation

Citation:

Weber, J., K. Goyne, T. Luxton, AND A. Thompson. Phosphate Treatment of Lead-Contaminated Soil: Effects on Water Quality, Plant Uptake, and Lead Speciation. Elizabeth Guertal, E. Charles Brummer, and Andrew Sharpley (ed.), JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY. American Society of Agronomy, MADISON, WI, 44(4):1127-1136, (2015).

Impact/Purpose:

The purpose of the current research was to examine the feasability of using phosphate based ammendments for immobilization of lead in contaminated flood plain soils.

Description:

Water quality threats associated with using phosphate-based amendments to remediate Pb-contaminated soils are a concern, particularly in riparian areas. This study investigated the effects of P application rates to a Pb-contaminated alluvial soil on Pb and P loss via surface water runoff, Pb accumulation in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb; Kentucky 31), and Pb speciation. An alluvial soil was treated with triple superphosphate at P to Pb molar ratios of 0:1(control), 4:1, 8:1, and 16:1. After a 6- mo reaction period, rainfall simulation (RFS) studies were conducted, followed by tall fescue establishment and a second set of RFS studies (1 yr after treatment). Results from the first RFS (unvegetated) demonstrated that the total Pb and P concentrations in the effluents of 8:1 and 16:1 (P:Pb molar ratio) treatment levels were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the control. One year after P treatment and 6 mo after vegetation establishment, total P and Pb concentrations of the effluents from a second RFS decreased by one to three orders of magnitude. Total and dissolved P concentration in runoff from the 16:1 P:Pb treatment remained significantly greater than all other treatments. However, total Pb concentration in the runoff was comparable among the treatments. Phosphorus treatment also reduced Pb uptake into tall fescue by > 55%. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy data showed that pyromorphite [Pb5(PO4)3OH,Cl,F] abundance ranged from 0% (control) to 32% (16:1 P:Pb; 1 yr after treatment) of the total soil Pb. Although P treatment stimulated pyromorphite formation, pyromorphite abundance was comparable between the P-treated soils. These findings suggest that a 4:1 (P:Pb molar ratio) P treatment may be a sufficient means of reducing Pb bioavailability while minimizing concerns related to P loss in an alluvial setting.

URLs/Downloads:

http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2014.10.0447   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 07/10/2015
Record Last Revised: 07/15/2015
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 308389

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION

WASTE MANAGEMENT BRANCH