Science Inventory

BIORECOVERY OF METALS FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE

Citation:

Scharp*, R A., F K. Kawahara*, J O. Burckle, R. Govind, AND J. Allen. BIORECOVERY OF METALS FROM ACID MINE DRAINAGE. Presented at In-situ and On-site Bioremediation Sixth International Symposium, San Diego, CA, 6/4-7/2001.

Description:

Acid mine water is an acidic, metal-bearing wastewater generated by the oxidation of metallic sulfides by certain bacteria in both active and abandoned mining operations. The wastewaters contain substantial quantities of dissolved solids with the particular pollutants dependant upon the mineralization occurring at the mined faces. Those usually encountered and considered of concern for risk assessment are: arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, zinc and sulfate. Occasionally, other minor elements are encountered that must be considered. The pollution generated by abandoned mining activities in the area of Butte, MT have resulted in the designation of the Silver Bow Creek - Butte Area as the largest Superfund (National Priorities List) site in the US. This paper reports the preliminary results of bench-scale studies conducted to develop a resource recovery based remediation process for the clean up of the Berkeley Pit. The process utilizes selective, sequential precipitation (SSP) of metal hydroxides and sulfides, such as copper, zinc, aluminum, iron and manganese, from the Berkeley Pit AMD for their removal from the water in a form suitable for additional processing into marketable precipitates and pigments.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 06/04/2001
Record Last Revised: 06/06/2005
Record ID: 61024

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH