Science Inventory

People, Planet and Profit: Unintended Consequences of Legacy Building Materials

Citation:

Zimmer, A. AND H. Ha. People, Planet and Profit: Unintended Consequences of Legacy Building Materials. R. Dewil, J.M. Evans, and B. Tansel (ed.), JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 204(1):472-485, (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.j.envman.2017.09.026

Impact/Purpose:

In the following paper, we use lead and asbestos as legacy building materials to show their similar historical trends and sustainability consequences. This paper also proposes an alternative methodology that can be applied to a cost-effective way into existing and upcoming building materials, to minimize and prevent potential unintended consequences and create a pathway to sustainable communities.

Description:

Although an explosion of new building materials are being introduced into today's market, adequate up-front research into their chemical and physical properties as well as their potential health and environmental consequences is lacking. History has provided us with several examples where building materials were broadly deployed into society only to find that health and environmental problems resulted in unintended sustainability consequences. In the following paper, we use lead and asbestos as legacy building materials to show their similar historical trends and sustainability consequences. Our research findings show unintended consequences such as: increased remediation and litigation costs; adverse health effects; offspring of related industries; and impediments to urban revitalization. As numerous new building materials enter today's market, another building material may have already been deployed, representing the next "asbestos." This paper also proposes an alternative methodology that can be applied in a cost-effective way into existing and upcoming building materials, to minimize and prevent potential unintended consequences and create a pathway to sustainable communities. For instance, our findings show that this proposed methodology could have prevented the unintended sustainability costs of approximately $272-$359 billion by investing roughly $24 million in constant 2014 U.S. dollars on up-front research into lead and asbestos.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.j.envman.2017.09.026   Exit

PEOPLE, PLANET AND PROFIT: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF LEGACY BUILDING MATERIALS   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 12/15/2017
Record Last Revised: 05/31/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 340645

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION