Science Inventory

Management applications of discontinuity theory

Citation:

Angler, D., C. Allen, C. Barichievy, T. Eason, A. Garmestani, N. Graham, D. Granholm, L. Gunderson, M. Knutson, K. Nash, R. Nelson, M. Nyström, T. Spanbauer, C. Stow, AND S. Sundstrom. Management applications of discontinuity theory. Journal of Applied Ecology. Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA, 53(3):688-698, (2015).

Impact/Purpose:

This manuscript provides insight on using discontinuity approaches to aid in managing complex ecological systems. In particular, we focus on the potential for discontinuity approaches to: spatially understand relative resilience, to objectively identify critical scales of space and time in ecological systems, to provide early warning indicators of regime change, to help predict and understand biological invasions and extinctions, and to focus monitoring efforts.

Description:

1.Human impacts on the environment are multifaceted and can occur across distinct spatiotemporal scales. Ecological responses to environmental change are therefore difficult to predict, and entail large degrees of uncertainty. Such uncertainty requires robust tools for management to sustain ecosystem goods and services and maintain resilient ecosystems. 2.We propose an approach based on discontinuity theory that accounts for patterns and processes at distinct spatial and temporal scales, an inherent property of ecological systems. Discontinuity theory has not been applied in natural resource management and could therefore improve ecosystem management because it explicitly accounts for ecological complexity. 3.Synthesis and applications. We highlight the application of discontinuity approaches for meeting management goals. Specifically, discontinuity approaches have significant potential to measure and thus understand the resilience of ecosystems, to objectively identify critical scales of space and time in ecological systems at which human impact might be most severe, to provide warning indicators of regime change, to help predict and understand biological invasions and extinctions and to focus monitoring efforts. Discontinuity theory can complement current approaches, providing a broader paradigm for ecological management and conservation

URLs/Downloads:

http://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12494   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 07/31/2015
Record Last Revised: 04/28/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 335874

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH