Science Inventory

Temperature effects on particulate emissions from DPF-equipped diesel trucks operating on conventional and biodiesel fuels

Citation:

Book, E., R. Snow, T. Long, T. Fang, AND R. Baldauf. Temperature effects on particulate emissions from DPF-equipped diesel trucks operating on conventional and biodiesel fuels. JOURNAL OF THE AIR & WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION. Air & Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, PA, 65(6):751-758, (2015).

Impact/Purpose:

Temperature effects on particulate emissions from DPF-equipped diesel trucks operating on conventional and biodiesel fuels

Description:

Two diesel trucks equipped with a particulate filter (DPF) were tested at two ambient temperatures (70oF and 20oF), fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel (B20)) and operating loads (a heavy and light weight). The test procedure included three driving cycles, a cold start with low transients (CSLT), the federal heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), and a warm start with low transients (WSLT). Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured second-by-second using an Aethalometer for black carbon (BC) concentrations and an Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) for particle count measurements. One vehicle experienced increased BC and particle number concentrations during cold starts under cold ambient conditions, with concentrations two to three times higher than under warm starts at higher ambient temperatures. The average particle count for the UDDS showed an approximately 27% decrease when ambient temperatures decreased from 70oF to 20oF. This vehicle also experienced decreased emissions when going from ULSD to B20, with an approximately 13% average decrease in PM number and an approximately 27% decrease in BC. The other vehicle tested had much lower emissions, with many of the BC and particle number measurements below detectable limits. However, both vehicles did experience elevated emissions from DPF regeneration events. All regeneration events occurred during the UDDS cycle. Slight increases in emissions were measured during the UDDS and WSLT cycles after the regeneration. However, the day after a regeneration occurred, following a 12-hour soak at ambient temperatures, both vehicles showed significant increases in particle number and BC for the CSLT drive cycle, with increases from 100 to 230 percent for PM number emissions compared with tests following a day with no regeneration.

URLs/Downloads:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10962247.2014.984817   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 06/26/2015
Record Last Revised: 07/15/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 320230