Science Inventory

Building a Database for Life Cycle Performance Assessment of Water and Wastewater Rehabilitation Technologies - abstract

Citation:

Selvakumar, A., S. Alam, AND E. Allouche. Building a Database for Life Cycle Performance Assessment of Water and Wastewater Rehabilitation Technologies - abstract. Water Environment Federation Collection Systems 2015 Conference, Cincinnati, OH, April 19 - 22, 2015.

Impact/Purpose:

Municipalities have expressed a strong desire for some hard data on the current condition of previously installed systems to validate or correct the assumptions made at the time of rehabilitation. Since several of the major pipe lining techniques have now been in use for at least 15 years (some nearly 30 years in the U.S. and 40 years internationally), it is a good time to undertake such an investigation to assess whether the originally planned lifetime (typically assumed to be 50 years) is reasonable based on the current condition of the liner.

Description:

Pipe rehabilitation and trenchless pipe replacement technologies have seen a steady increase in use over the past 30 to 40 years and represent an increasing proportion of the approximately $25 billion annual expenditure on operations and maintenance of the nation’s water and wastewater infrastructure. Despite the massive public investment represented by the use of these technologies, there has been little formal and quantitative evaluation of whether they are performing as expected and whether rehabilitation is indeed cost-effective compared to replacement. The biggest data gap in asset management for pipeline systems involving rehabilitation is prediction of the remaining asset life for the existing pipe and how long rehabilitation techniques can extend that life. Municipalities have expressed a strong desire for some hard data on the current condition of previously installed systems to validate or correct the assumptions made at the time of rehabilitation. Since several of the major pipe lining techniques have now been in use for at least 15 years (some nearly 30 years in the U.S. and 40 years internationally), it is a good time to undertake such an investigation to assess whether the originally planned lifetime (typically assumed to be 50 years) is reasonable based on the current condition of the liner. The objective of this study was to create a national database of performance results for technologies used in the rehabilitation of gravity sewers, together with the means for interpreting the results through data mining techniques. Specimens from multiple lining techniques were collected from twenty-seven (27) in-service sites, and were subjected to a battery of physical tests, capturing quantitative experimental data as well as broader qualitative data from the agencies that participated in the study. The test results and supporting information were exported into a custom-developed web-tool which enables the user to explore and interrogate the data using a series of statistical tools which were built into the software. Information provided include trends over time of key mechanical properties as well as establishing relationships among various properties, in an attempt to identify indicator(s) of degradation of the liner system and the rate of such degradation mechanisms over time. The paper describes the samples’ exhuming and testing program, web-based tool and present key results from the data analysis. Developed as a ‘live’ tool, the software is capable of re-generating the statistical analyses as new test data become available.

URLs/Downloads:

http://www.wef.org/uploadedFiles/Conferences_and_Events/Specialty_Conferences/Specialty_Conferences_Details/CS2014%20Draft%20Program%202-4-15%20update.pdf   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 04/22/2015
Record Last Revised: 06/09/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 316990