Science Inventory

Reduction of Multi-pollutant Emissions from Industrial Sectors: The U.S. Cement Industry – A Case Study

Citation:

SRIVASTAVA, R. K., S. Vijay, AND E. TORRES. Reduction of Multi-pollutant Emissions from Industrial Sectors: The U.S. Cement Industry – A Case Study. Chapter 8, Global Climate Change--The Technology Challenge. Springer, New York, NY, ISBN:9048131529:pg.241-272, (2011).

Impact/Purpose:

book chapter

Description:

For Frank Princiotta’s book, Global Climate Change—The Technology Challenge Carbon dioxide (CO2) accounts for more than 90% of worldwide CO2-eq green-house gas (GHG) emissions from industrial sectors other than power generation. Amongst these sectors, the cement industry is one of the larger industrial sources of CO2 emissions. In 2005, this industry accounted for about 6% of the global CO2 emissions. Further, global production of cement has been growing steadily, with the main growth being in Asia. Considering these trends, the worldwide cement industry is a key industrial sector relative to CO2 emissions. The development of policy options for managing emissions and air quality can be made more effective and efficient through sophisticated analyses of relevant technical and economic factors. Such analyses are greatly enhanced by the use of an appropriate modeling framework. Accordingly, the Industrial Sectors Integrated Solutions (ISIS) model for industrial sectors is under development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). Currently, this model is populated with data on the U.S. ce-ment-manufacturing sector and efforts are underway to build representations of the U.S. pulp and paper and iron and steel sectors. In this chapter, ISIS was used to conduct an example analysis of the U.S. cement sector to gain some insights relative to two broad questions: (1) what rangel of CO2 reductions may be practi-cable in the near-term, and (2) for that range, what may be the market characteris-tics for the U.S. cement industry. These questions are relevant because in the ab-sence of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology, the path forward for reducing CO2 emissions in the near-term (decade ending 2020) will need to de-pend on the currently available energy efficiency measures and raw material and product substitution approaches.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (BOOK CHAPTER)
Product Published Date: 07/01/2011
Record Last Revised: 08/10/2011
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 225973

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION