Science Inventory

WASTE STABILIZATION FUNDAMENTALS FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS

Citation:

TOLAYMAT, T. M. AND T. TOWNSEND. WASTE STABILIZATION FUNDAMENTALS FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS. Presented at EPA Region 5 Bioreactor Landfill Workshop, Chicago, IL, September 27, 2005.

Impact/Purpose:

to present information

Description:

Waste stabilization is the process where putrescible waste is biodegraded by microorganisms resulting in an end-product being a relatively inert substrate (e.g., like compost). When exposed to moisture, biologically stabilized waste should not produce substantial quantities of biogas and should not produce a leachate with a high oxygen demand. Biodegradable waste components (e.g., food waste, paper prodcuts, yard trash) are partially consumed by microorganisms. For many biodegradable waste components, some of the component remains after stabilization occurs. As historically conceptualized these phases consider the landfill to be primiarily an anaerobic system. Oxygen initially present in the waste is quickly used by aerobic organisms. When oxygen is consumed, anaerobic organisms predominate. Some break down large molecules into smaller soluble molecules. Other organisms produce acids from these soluble molecules. Finally, another group of organisms produce CH4 and CO2 from the acids. In most landfill operations the predominant phase in the methanogenic phase; the pH of most landfills is in the methanogenic range (6.5-8.0). Since waste is continually placed in an operating landfill, different phases will exist in different areas at the same time.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 09/27/2005
Record Last Revised: 02/06/2008
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 139426

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION

WASTE MANAGEMENT BRANCH