Science Inventory

SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

Citation:

Ring, J. J., S. Beckman, AND O. Kitaplioglu. SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT. EPA/540/R-94/529 (NTIS 96-116488), 1995.

Impact/Purpose:

information

Description:

This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration Test of Environmental Improvement Technologies’ (EIT) Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. The technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in conjunction with an independent one-year testing of the technology to provide justification for the execution of an Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) to the Record of Decision (ROD) for Operable Unit (OU) Number One. Under the SITE Program, the technology was evaluated to determine its effectiveness in reducing volatile organic contamination in the vadose zone of the former “dry well area” of the Electra-Voice facility after one year of treatment. The technology was evaluated against the nine criteria for decision-making in the Superfund Feasibility Study process. The results of this evaluation are presented in Table ES- 1. The SVVS process is an integrated technology that utilizes the benefits of soil vapor extraction/air sparging and in-situ bioremediation for the treatment of subsurface organic contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS process evaluated under the USEPA SITE Program was developed and designed by Billings and Associates, Inc. (BAI) and operated by Brown & Root Environmental (B&RE) (formerly Halliburton NUS Environmental Corporation) (For the purposes of this report, BAI and B&RE are referred to as the developer and operator, respectfully). The SVVS process uses vapor extraction to remove the easily-strippable volatile components and biostimulation to remove the less volatile more tightly sorbed components. Vapor extraction appears to be the more dominant removal mechanism during the early phases of treatment, while biostimulation processes dominate in later phases. During the early stages of system application, when vapor extraction is the dominant treatment mechanism, the extracted vapors might need to be treated above ground before release to the atmosphere. During this period, which can last anywhere from two weeks to a few months, the developer claims that system off-gasses can be treated by BAI’s Biological Emission Control ( B E C ) biofilters, alone or in combination with conventional activated carbon or other mechanisms for additional air polishing. The developer claims that remediation using the combination of vapor extraction and biostimulation is more rapid than the use of biostimulation alone, while generating lower quantities of volatile organic emissions than vapor extraction technologies. In addition, the SVVS can remediate contaminants that would not be remediated by vapor extraction alone (chemicals with lower volatilities and /or chemicals that are tightly sorbed). These benefits translate into lower costs and faster remediations.

URLs/Downloads:

SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

540_R-94_529.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 1 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (SITE DOCUMENT/REPORT)
Product Published Date: 08/01/1995
Record Last Revised: 09/08/2008
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 129493

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION