Office of Research and Development Publications

Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive Sampler Uptake and Aquatic Organism Bioaccumulation,

Citation:

Burgess, R. AND A. Joyce. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive Sampler Uptake and Aquatic Organism Bioaccumulation,. Remediation and Management of Contaminated Sediments. Ninth International Conference, New Orleans, LA, January 09 - 12, 2017.

Impact/Purpose:

This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a reliable surrogate for biomonitoring organisms when these species are not available. When applied properly, passive sampling based estimates of bioaccumulation provide useful information for making informed scientific and environmental management decisions about the bioavailability of HOCs in aquatic environments.

Description:

Objectives. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Approach/Activities. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Results/Lessons Learned. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in strong logarithmic regression relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). Passive sampler uptake and bioaccumulation were not found to be identical (i.e., CPS ≠ CL) but the logarithmic-based relationships between these values were consistently linear and predictive. This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a reliable surrogate for biomonitoring organisms when these species are not available. When applied properly, passive sampling based estimates of bioaccumulation provide useful information for making informed scientific and environmental management decisions about the bioavailability of HOCs in aquatic environments.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 01/09/2017
Record Last Revised: 01/17/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 335074