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Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal Cortex and Cerebellum of Young-Adult, Middle Age, and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

Citation:

Kodavanti, P., Joyce E. Royland, Judy E. Richards, D. Agina-Obu, AND R. MacPhail. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal Cortex and Cerebellum of Young-Adult, Middle Age, and Senescent Brown Norway Rats. Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, March 23 - 27, 2015.

Impact/Purpose:

This abstract will be presented at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) Annual Meeting March 23-27, 2014, San Diego, CA

Description:

Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone (03), and adverse health effects including dysfunction of the pulmonary, cardiac, and nervous systems. The objective of this study was to test whether OS plays a role in the adverse effects caused by 03 exposure, and if so, if effects were age-dependent. We selected protein carbonyl as an indicator of OS because carbonyl content of cells is a useful indicator of oxidative protein damage and has been linked to chemical-induced adverse effects. Male Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were exposed to 03 (0,0.25 or 1 ppm) via inhalation for 6 h/day, 2 days per week for 13 weeks. Frontal cortex (FC) and cerebellum (CB) were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C. Protein carbonyls were assayed using commercial kits. Hydrogen peroxide, a positive control, increased protein carbonyls in cortical tissue in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant effects of age on protein carbonyls in FC and a significant effect of age and 03 dose on protein carbonyls in CB were observed. In control rats, there was an age-dependent increase in protein carbonyls indicating increased OS in 12 and 24 month old rats compared to 4 month old rats. Although 03 increased protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups, 03 effects were statistically significant only in the 4 month old rats. These results indicate that FC and CB of 4 month old rats are more susceptible to oxidative damage caused by 03 when compared to those from12 month and 24 month old rats. (This abstract does not necessarily reflectUSEPA policy).

URLs/Downloads:

TAD-15-001-ABSTRACT.DOCX

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 03/26/2015
Record Last Revised: 04/16/2015
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 307697