Science Inventory

PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

Citation:

Hudson, R., M J. Hemmer, K. Salinas, S S. Wilkinson, J. Watts, J T. Winstead, P S. Harris, A. Kirkpatrick, AND C C. Walker. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL. Presented at SETAC World Congress, Portland, OR, November 14 - 18, 2004.

Impact/Purpose:

Conference abstract

Description:

Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1011).

Current testing methods for endocrine disruption are animal intensive and lack the rapid throughput necessary to screen large numbers of environmental chemicals for adverse effects. Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) was used to invetigate plasma protein profiling as a means to screen chemical inventories for pathway specific toxicity using a small fish model. Protein profiling is a technique for identifying protein biomarker fingerprints indicative of a "diseased" state when compared with a "normal" state. Similarly sized adult male sheepshead minnows, (Cyprinodon variegatus), were placed into flow-through aquaria (30 fish each) consisting of duplicate tanks for seawater control, vehicle control, and 17b-estradiol treatments of 50 ng/mL and 200 ng/mL. Test concentrations were maintained by intermittent seawater flow and injection of test stock solutions for the chemical and carrier control treatments. Fish were sampled at 7 days, plasma applied to ProteinChipa arrays and analyzed. Estrogen-specific spectral fingerprints were identified using pattern recognition software. No difference was found between protein profiles of seawater control and carrier control (triethylene glycol) treated fish. A number of protein peaks, ranging from 1-25 kDa, were identified as markers of estrogenic effects when comparing estrogen treated and control fish. We show that an estrogenic compound produces distinct biomarkers, based on the presence or absence of plasma proteins. We are also investigating protein patterns of other compounds, representing receptor-mediated and non-receptor mediated pathways of estrogenic toxicity, for comparison with the 17b-estradiol signature, using a predictive estrogen-responsive pattern recognition model. Although the patterns generated will be specific to the species tested, the protocol should be readily transferrable to any species or chemical toxicity mechanism of interest.

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 11/14/2004
Record Last Revised: 07/27/2012
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 92345

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION

BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND POPULATION RESPONSE BRANCH