Science Inventory

DOSE-RESPONSE FOR UV-INDUCED IMMUNE SUPPRESSION IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: DIFFERENCES BASED ON ERYTHEMAL REACTIVITY RATHER THAN SKIN PIGMENTATION

Citation:

Selgrade, MJK, M. V. Smith, L. J. OberhelmanBragg, G. J. LeVee, H S. Koren, AND K. D. Cooper. DOSE-RESPONSE FOR UV-INDUCED IMMUNE SUPPRESSION IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: DIFFERENCES BASED ON ERYTHEMAL REACTIVITY RATHER THAN SKIN PIGMENTATION. PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOBIOLOGY. American Society for Photobiology, Lawrence, KS, 74(1):88-95, (2001).

Description:

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to suppress immune responses in human subjects. The purpose of this study was to develop dose responses across a broad range of skin pigmentation in order to facilitate risk assessment. UVR was administered using FS 20 bulbs. Skin pigmentation and UVR sensitivity were evaluated using Fitzpatrick classifications, minimal erythemal dose (MED), slope of the erythemal dose response curve (sED), baseline pigmentation and tanning response. To assess immune responses dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) was applied to irradiated buttock skin 72 h after irradiation. Two weeks later DNCB was applied to the inside upper arm. Skin thickness was measured before and after challenge. Dose response was modeled (to obtain a regression line) for the entire group of 185 subjects. With the exception of sED none of the above-mentioned pigmentation indicators contributed significantly to variability around the regression line. Thus, differences in sensitivity for multiple skin types based on Fitzpatrick classification or MED were not observed. However, differences in immune sensitivity to UVR were detected between subjects with steep erythemal dose response curves and those with moderate or flat responses. For subjects with steep erythemal responses the dose calculated to suppress the immune response by 50% was 114 mJ/cm2. This group included individuals with Fitzpatrick skin types I-V, MED for these subjects ranged from 30 to 80 mJ/cm2. The 50% suppression dose for subjects with weak or no erythemal response could not be computed (the dose response was flat). This resistant group included subjects with skin types IV-VI and MED for these subjects ranged from 41 to > 105 mJ/cm2. This study provides a human dose response for UVR suppression of contact sensitivity that will be useful in risk assessment. It is the first study to provide this information using the FS sun lamp and is the first study to include people of color. The sED appears to be a new variable for identifying sensitive subjects at risk of UVR-induced immune suppression.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 07/20/2001
Record Last Revised: 12/22/2005
Record ID: 80567

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN STUDIES DIVISION

IMMEDIATE OFFICE