Science Inventory

ROLE OF MONOCYTES AND EOSINOPHILS IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION

Citation:

Becker, S E. AND J M. Soukup. ROLE OF MONOCYTES AND EOSINOPHILS IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION. CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY. Elsevier Science BV, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 107:178-185, (2003).

Description:

Role of Monocytes and Eosinophils
in Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection

Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker

US Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental
Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711;

Running Title: Immune modulation of RSV infection
Key words: Respiratory syncytial virus, monocytes, eosinophil, cytokines, chemokines, surface markers

Correspondence:
Susanne Becker, Ph.D.
EPA Building, Human Studies Facility
104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill
NC 27599
Tel: 919 966 0676; E-mail Becker.susanne@epa.gov

Abstract

RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (EC) results in production of the chemokines RANTES and MIP1 , and the leukocyte differentiation factor GM-CSF. The chemokines attract monocytes (Monos) and eosinophils (Eos) to the site of infection where GM-CSF may influence their function and differentiation. In turn, these inflammatory cells may limit the progression of RSV infection, as well as initiate immune responses. In the present study, the effect of Monos and Eos on viral replication and infection dependent release of EC-derived cytokines was investigated.. The modulation of immune cell co-stimulatory molecules, CD80, CD86, CD40, CD1a and HLA-DR, and the release of the CD4+ T cell chemoattractant IL-16 were also investigated. Employing immunofluorescence techniques, Monos and Eos in co-cultures with infected EC were found to inhibit spread of RSV to uninfected cells. Monos also had a significant effect on replication of RSV. Monos phagocytized the virus while Eos inhibited reinfection mainly by extracellular means. The release of G-CSF and GM-CSF in the infected cultures was not significantly affected by either Monos or Eos, while RANTES release was significantly decreased. The expression of CD 40, CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR on Monos, but not on Eos, increased in an RSV dose dependent manner. IL-16 release was not induced in RSV-infected EC, but was significantly increased in co-culture with Monos. These results suggest that both Monos and Eos attracted to the site of RSV infection play an important role in confining infection, while RSV-exposed Monos , may be involved in promoting/polarizing immune responses to RSV.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 02/25/2003
Record Last Revised: 12/22/2005
Record ID: 65803

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

HUMAN STUDIES DIVISION

CLINICAL RESEARCH BRANCH