Science Inventory

ARE ELEMENTAL FINGERPRINTS OF FISH OTOLITHS DISTINCT AMONG GREAT LAKES COASTAL NURSERY AREAS?

Citation:

Brazner, J. C., S. E. Campana, AND D K. Tanner. ARE ELEMENTAL FINGERPRINTS OF FISH OTOLITHS DISTINCT AMONG GREAT LAKES COASTAL NURSERY AREAS? Presented at Society of Conservation Biology Annual Meeting, Duluth, MN, June 28-July 3, 2003.

Description:

Elemental composition of an otolith reflects a fish's rearing environment,
so otolith geochemistry can record differences in ambient water conditions
specific to habitats used during a fish's life history. Although few studies
have been conducted in freshwater, trace element analysis of marine fish
otoliths has proven useful in identifying chemical signatures unique to
particular spawning and nursery habitats. To examine its utility in
freshwater, sagittae were removed from young-of-the-year yellow perch
captured from 8 wetlands in western Lake Superior during August, 2001. They
were analyzed for 13 elements (Al, Ba, B, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mg, Mn, K, Na, Sr, Zn,
and Li) using ICP-MS and ICP-AES. Mean Ba, B, Li, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, Na, K, and
Sr concentrations differed significantly among sites. Discriminant function
analysis revealed relatively distinct habitat fingerprints associated with
each site. Site classification accuracy based on jack-knife procedures
ranged from 63 to 100 percent and averaged 75 percent. Our results suggest
that wetland fingerprints based on otolith elemental analysis may be useful
for quantifying relative contributions of different nursery areas to
recruitment in adjacent lake populations. This abstract does not reflect
U.S.EPA policy.

Elemental composition of an otolith reflects a fishes rearing environment,
so otolith geochemistry can record differences in ambient water conditions
specific to habitats used during a fishes life history. Although few studies
have been conducted in freshwater, trace element analysis of marine fish
otoliths has proven useful in identifying chemical signatures unique to
particular spawning and nursery habitats. To examine its utility in
freshwater, sagittae were removed from young-of-the-year yellow perch
captured from 8 wetlands in western Lake Superior during August, 2001. They
were analyzed for 13 elements (Al, Ba, B, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mg, Mn, K, Na, Sr, Zn,
and Li) using ICP-MS and ICP-AES. Mean Ba, B, Li, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, Na, K, and
Sr concentrations differed significantly among sites. Discriminant function
analysis revealed relatively distinct habitat fingerprints associated with
each site. Site classification accuracy based on jack-knife procedures
ranged from 63 to 100 percent and averaged 75 percent. Our results suggest
that wetland fingerprints based on otolith elemental analysis may be useful
for quantifying relative contributions of different nursery areas to
recruitment in adjacent lake populations. This abstract does not reflect
U.S.EPA policy.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 06/28/2003
Record Last Revised: 06/21/2006
Record ID: 62464