Science Inventory

Using occupancy modeling to compare traditional versus DNA metabarcoding methods for characterizing zooplankton biodiversity

Citation:

Meredith, C., J. Hoffman, A. Trebitz, E. Pilgrim, J. Martinson, AND S. Okum. Using occupancy modeling to compare traditional versus DNA metabarcoding methods for characterizing zooplankton biodiversity. Freshwater Science, Detroit, MI, May 20 - 24, 2018.

Impact/Purpose:

DNA metabarcoding increases detectability of some zooplankton taxa, and could complement traditional taxonomy efforts in characterizing zooplankton communities.

Description:

DNA metabarcoding tools could increase our ability to detect changes in zooplankton communities and to detect invasive zooplankton taxa while they are still rare. Nonetheless, the use of DNA-metabarcoding for characterizing zooplankton biodiversity in the Great Lakes has not been fully explored. In summer 2016, we collected multiple zooplankton samples within the same locations extending from nearshore areas of Western Lake Superior to the open lake. Individual zooplankton taxa were sanger-sequenced and this genetic information will be added to online databases. We used occupancy modeling methods to explore whether DNA meta-barcoding increased the likelihood that individual zooplankton taxa would be detected when present. Zooplankton communities showed high spatial variability. Although we only collected three replicates, at least 16 of the 39 taxa we observed were rare in samples and could only be detected reliably if more than five samples were collected at a location. DNA metabarcoding increased detectability of some zooplankton taxa, and could complement traditional taxonomy in efforts to characterize Great Lakes zooplankton communities.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 05/24/2018
Record Last Revised: 05/21/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 340837

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

MID-CONTINENT ECOLOGY DIVISION