Science Inventory

Cardiovascular Effects of Air Pollution Clinical and Public Health Implications: Knowledge Gaps and Opportunities

Citation:

Cascio, W. Cardiovascular Effects of Air Pollution Clinical and Public Health Implications: Knowledge Gaps and Opportunities. NEHA-NHLBI Cardiovascular Research Division Meeting, Bethesda, Maryland, March 06, 2018.

Impact/Purpose:

An information webinar will be provided to a subset of the membership of the National Environmental Health Association on the topic of the health impacts of air pollution and tools and approaches that the NEHA membership can take to educate the public. NEHA currently serves 5,000 members to advance the environmental health and protection professional for the purpose of providing a healthful environment for all. NEHA provides training and resources for continuing education through online courses and an online bookstore; holds an annual conference; fosters networking and career growth; and publishes the widely-respected peer-reviewed Journal of Environmental Health. The content of the webinar will further the knowledge-base of the NEHA’s membership related to air pollution and health, and will provide information about sources of information that EPA and CDC/CMS provide to mitigate cardiovascular risk.

Description:

“Healthy Heart: Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Health” is a webinar presentation designed to introduce the fundamental epidemiological associations between ambient air pollution and cardiovascular health. Despite the phenomenal improvement in air quality across the U.S. air pollution remains a significant public health concern. The content describes the estimates of the global and U.S. health burden linked to air pollutant exposures and the associated health care costs. Sufficient data on the cardiovascular health effects of air particle pollution have been present for nearly a decade supporting a determination of causality by the U.S. EPA. We now know that air pollution produces a high attributable health burden. Vulnerable populations, such as people with established heart and lung disease, older adults, children and pregnant women are at higher risk. Short-term exposures can trigger heart attack, stroke, arrhythmia and worsen heart failure. There is no established threshold level for safe long-term exposure. The pathophysiological mechanisms are now known. Long-term exposures to air particle pollution is associated with more severe atherosclerosis. Whereas, decreased long-term air pollutant exposure associates with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Yet, despite this information and the recommendation of medical professional organizations to educate the public health care professionals do not educate their patients about what actions they can take to reduce exposure in those most at risk. Healthy Heart was developed as a way to educate public health officials, healthcare professionals, patients and public on the health impacts of air pollution and to provide a rational approach to reducing risk in those at highest risk from air particle pollution. The presentation will conclude with a brief summary of sources and products available to the public to educate them on this topic.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 03/06/2018
Record Last Revised: 04/19/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 340485

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

IMMEDIATE OFFICE

RESEARCH PLANNING AND COORDINATION STAFF