Science Inventory

Smoke Sense: Citizen Science Study on Health Risk and Health Risk Communication During Wildfire Smoke Episodes

Citation:

Rappold, A. AND M. Hano. Smoke Sense: Citizen Science Study on Health Risk and Health Risk Communication During Wildfire Smoke Episodes. American Public Health Association (APHA)( 2017 Meeting, Atlanta, GA, November 04 - 11, 2017.

Impact/Purpose:

To be presented at the American Public Health Association (APHA) 2017 Meeting, November 4-8, 2017, Atlanta, GA.

Description:

Why do we need to communicate smoke impacts on health? Indicence and severity of large fires are increasing. As emissions from the Wildland fires produce air pollution that adversely impacts people's health, incidence and severity of large fires are increasing. As emissions from other sources of PM decrease, relative contributions of Fire-PM increase. There is need for a public health strategy to address air quality during these periodic transient exposures. Smoke Sense: Is a Citizen Science Study with goals to: 1-determine the extent to which exposure to wildland fire smoke affects health and productivity; 2-develop health risk communication strategies that protect public health during smoke days. It involves engagement at individual and community levels. Smoke Sense - delivers information to the users directly and facilitates engagement with the issue.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/SLIDE)
Product Published Date: 11/05/2017
Record Last Revised: 02/12/2018
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 339650

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION