Science Inventory

Comparative Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Soy-biodiesel and Petroleum-Diesel Emissions: Overview of Studies from the U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

Citation:

Madden, M. Comparative Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Soy-biodiesel and Petroleum-Diesel Emissions: Overview of Studies from the U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY. Informa Healthcare USA, New York, NY, 27(11):511-514, (2015).

Impact/Purpose:

This manuscript is the introductory article for a several articles in a special edition of the journal Inhalation Toxicology devoted to a series of studies performed at the US EPA in RTP NC which examined the toxicity and mutagenic potential of biodiesel combustion emissions. The rationale for performing the studies, a summarized results from each article, and the implications for future studies are outlined.

Description:

Biodiesel use as a fuel is increasing globally as an alternate to petroleum sources. To comprehensively assess the effects of the use of biodiesel as an energy source, end stage uses of biodiesel such as the effects of inhalation of combusted products on human health must be incorporated. To date, few reports concerning the toxicological effects of the emissions of combusted biodiesel or blends of biodiesel on surrogates of health effects have been published. The relative toxicity of the combusted biodiesel emissions compared to petroleum diesel emissions with short term exposures is also not well known. To address the paucity of findings on the toxicity of combusted biodiesel emissions, studies were undertaken at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratories in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The studies used a variety of approaches with nonhuman animal models to examine biological responses of the lung and cardiovascular systems induced by acute and repeated exposures to pure biodiesel and biodiesel blended with petroleum diesel. Effects of the emissions on induction of mutations in bacterial test strains and mammalian DNA adducts were also characterized and normalized to engine work load. The emissions were characterized as to the physiochemical composition in order to determine the magnitude of the differences among the emissions utilized in the studies. This article summarizes the major finding of these studies which are contained within this special issue of Inhalation Toxicology. The findings provided in these articles provide information about the toxicity of biodiesel emissions relative to petroleum diesel emissions and which can be utilized in a life cycle analyses of the effects of increased biodiesel usage.

URLs/Downloads:

https://doi.org/10.3109/08958378.2015.1107153    Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 09/30/2015
Record Last Revised: 11/22/2017
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 310078

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

CLINICAL RESEARCH BRANCH