Science Inventory

Great Lakes rivermouth ecosystems: scientific synthesis and management implications

Citation:

Larson, J., A. Trebitz, A. Steinman, M. Wiley, M. Carlson-Mazur, V. Pebbles, H. Braun, AND P. Seelbach. Great Lakes rivermouth ecosystems: scientific synthesis and management implications. JOURNAL OF GREAT LAKES RESEARCH. International Association for Great Lakes Research, Ann Arbor, MI, 39(3):513-524, (2013).

Impact/Purpose:

Rivermouth ecosystems contribute to both the ecological dynamics and the human social networks that surround and depend on the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, understanding and management of these systems would be enhanced by viewing them with a new, holistic focus. Here, focus is re-asserted with a system-level synthesis of ecosystem structure and function in rivermouths to highlight gaps in both the understanding of how these ecosystems function and how they provide services to the communities surrounding them. A conceptual model is presented and used to link ecosystem structure and function to ecological services provided to surrounding communities and the Great Lakes as a whole. Continuing efforts to manage the Great Lakes ecosystems for the benefit of both ecological and economic interests will require a better understanding of tributary-to-lake processes and, conversely, lake side processes that influence upriver activities and how the complex hydrodynamics influence ecological and socio-economic activities, such as eutrophication and economic development, respectively.

Description:

Rivermouth ecosystems contribute to both the ecological dynamics and the human social networks that surround and depend on the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, understanding and management of these systems would be enhanced by viewing them with a new, holistic focus. Here, focus is re-asserted with a system-level synthesis of ecosystem structure and function in rivermouths to highlight gaps in both the understanding of how these ecosystems function and how they provide services to the communities surrounding them. A conceptual model is presented and used to link ecosystem structure and function to ecological services provided to surrounding communities and the Great Lakes as a whole. Continuing efforts to manage the Great Lakes ecosystems for the benefit of both ecological and economic interests will require a better understanding of tributary-to-lake processes and, conversely, lake side processes that influence upriver activities and how the complex hydrodynamics influence ecological and socio-economic activities, such as eutrophication and economic development, respectively.

URLs/Downloads:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jglr.2013.06.002   Exit

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 09/06/2013
Record Last Revised: 06/19/2015
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 259830