Science Inventory

Neuroproteomics and Environmental Chemical-induced Adverse Effects

Citation:

Kodavanti, P. Neuroproteomics and Environmental Chemical-induced Adverse Effects. Presented at Symposium on Env. Impacts, Health Implicaitons and Therapeutic Approaches, July 15 - 17, 2012.

Impact/Purpose:

will be presented at the International Symposium on Environmental Impacts, Health Implications and Therapeutic Approaches, July 15-17, 2012, Nellore, India - THIS CLEARANCE PACKAGE HAS ALREADY BEEN CLEARED - UPDATED ABSTRACT IS ATTACHED

Description:

Technological advances in science have aided the field of neuroproteomics with refined tools for the study of the expression, interaction, and function of proteins in the nervous system. With the aid of bioinformatics, neuroproteomics can reveal the organization of dynamic, functional protein networks and macromolecular structures that are the basis for behavioral, anatomical, and functional processes. Neuroproteomics promotes understanding of post-translational modifications where proteins are chemically modified or regulated after synthesis, including protein 3-D conformation which can determine function. The most common techniques used in proteomics are two-dimension differential gel electrophoresis (2-DIGE) and protein arrays, which are powerful tools to separate complex protein mixtures and analyze proteomes. Mass spectrometry in conjunction with multiple databases and computer programs is used in protein identification. This approach can be used to identify all proteins in a particular sample, elucidate components of biochemical pathways, and analyze post-translational modifications in a small or large scale. Neuroproteomics has already demonstrated its value by identifying early biomarkers following neuronal damage in drug addiction or brain injury, and in monitoring nerve growth. In regards to chemically-induced adverse effects on the nervous system, proteomics can aid in understanding mode of action in an efficient way as well as identify biomarkers for the toxic effects. The identification of biomarkers based on mode of action can aid in the development of in vitro models to screen and prioritize chemicals for further neurotoxicity testing. Studies on two neurotoxicants well established in both humans and animal models (Aroclor 1254, a commercial polychlorinated biphenyl mixture; DE-71, a commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether mixture) have revealed that proteins related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP SYnthase, sub unit B (ATP5B), creatine kin

URLs/Downloads:

TAD-12-032-ABSTRACT-FINAL.PDF   (PDF,NA pp, 323.908 KB,  about PDF)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 07/17/2012
Record Last Revised: 10/22/2014
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 251763

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION