Science Inventory

ENDOMETRIOSIS IN A COHORT OF WOMEN LIVING IN THE KANAWHA RIVER VALLEY IN WEST VIRGINIA: BLOOD LEVELS OF NON-DIOXIN-LIKE PCBs AND RELATIONSHIP WITH BMI AND AGE

Citation:

DILIBERTO, J. J., L. Sirinek, B. Burkhalter, D. S. Wikoff, G. Hixon, J. Becker, D. S. Jude, D. G. Patterson, W. Turner, J. A. Tachovsky, L. S. Birnbaum, AND L. C. Haws. ENDOMETRIOSIS IN A COHORT OF WOMEN LIVING IN THE KANAWHA RIVER VALLEY IN WEST VIRGINIA: BLOOD LEVELS OF NON-DIOXIN-LIKE PCBs AND RELATIONSHIP WITH BMI AND AGE. Presented at 31st International Symposium on Halogenated Environmental Organic Pollutants and POPs, Brussels, BELGIUM, August 21 - 26, 2011.

Impact/Purpose:

The present study intends to build on the most recent investigation by evaluating the role of BMI and age, as well as examining potential associations of TEQ and non-DL PCBs with endometriosis in the KRVCSW cohort and a control population. Also, previous statistical assessments on DLCs were replicated with non-DL PCB data to evaluate potential relationships with endometriosis in the KRVCSW cohort as these serum concentrations were measured in the initial study but were not included in previous analyses.

Description:

Industrial activities, specifically from petroleum and chemical manufacturing facilities, in the Kanawha River Valley (KRV) of West Virginia have resulted in releases of dioxin and dioxin-like chemicals (DLCs). I Most of the dioxin found in this region has resulted from the production of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and the disposal of related wastes. Although the production of 2,4,5-T was stopped more than thirty years ago, dioxin is still present in the soils, sediments, groundwater in many areas of the Kanawha Valley, as well as surface water and sediments in the Kanawha River and much of its watershed. I An empirical observation made by local medical providers suggested a potentially elevated incidence of endometriosis among young women who were long-term residents of the KRV.2 Thus, a study was designed to evaluate a possible link between dioxin exposure and the incidence of endometriosis in a potentially highly exposed population in West Virginia. Epidemiological data related to environmental exposures to dioxin were evaluated in two groups of patients undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy for either endometriosis or control procedures unrelated to endometriosis, hereby referred to as the KRVCSW cohort/ The investigation demonstrated that serum levels of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in this population were similar to levels previously reported in the general US population and serum concentrations measured in the present study also exhibited a linear relationship between total toxic equivalency (TEQ) concentration and age.' Further in a subsequent analysis of these data using principal components analysis (PCA) we reported that the body burdens of dioxin and dioxin-like chemicals in KRVCSW participants with and without a diagnosis of endometriosis could not be distinguished on the basis of dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) and/or DL polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener profiles, indicating that endometriosis is not likely related to the low serum TEQ concentrations in this population." Logistic regression models also indicated that endometriosis did not appear to be associated with age, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in serum. 4 The present study intends to build on the most recent investigation by evaluating the role of BMI and age, as well as examining potential associations of TEQ and non-DL PCBs with endometriosis in the KRVCSW cohort and a control population. Also, previous statistical assessments on DLCs were replicated with non-DL PCB data to evaluate potential relationships with endometriosis in the KRVCSW cohort as these serum concentrations were measured in the initial study but were not included in previous analyses

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 08/26/2011
Record Last Revised: 05/07/2012
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 235499

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

INTEGRATED SYSTEMS TOXICOLOGY DIVISION

PHARMACOKINETICS BRANCH