Science Inventory

Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis.

Citation:

KORTE, J. J., R. M. STERNBERG, J. A. SERRANO, K. R. THOEMKE, S. M. MOEN, K. E. LILLEGARD, M. W. HORNUNG, J. E. TIETGE, AND S. J. DEGITZ. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH): Measurement of Intracellular, Secreted, and Circulating Hormone in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis. GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY. Academic Press Incorporated, Orlando, FL, 171(3):319-325, (2011).

Impact/Purpose:

To describe the first specific method to measure the amounts of TSH in Xenopus frog species and to be useful to those studying the disruption of the normal developmental processes brought about by agents whose actions affect TH production and elimination.

Description:

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced in the pituitary that stimulates the thyroid gland to grow and produce thyroid hormone (TH). The concentration of TH controls developmental changes that take place in a wide variety of organisms. Many use the metaphoric changes in amphibians as a model to study potential disruption of the normal processes controlled by this hormone. This manuscript describes the first specific method to measure the amounts of TSH in Xenopus frog species and will be useful to those studying the disruption of the normal developmental processes brought about by agents whose actions affect TH production and elimination.

URLs/Downloads:

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Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 05/01/2011
Record Last Revised: 08/06/2012
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 227565

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

MID-CONTINENT ECOLOGY DIVISION

MOLECULAR & CELLULAR MECHANISMS RESEARCH