Science Inventory

Preliminary assessment of developmental toxicity of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acid in mice

Citation:

Tatum, K. R., K. DAS, B. E. GREY, C. LAU, M. Stryner, AND A. B. LINDSTROM. Preliminary assessment of developmental toxicity of Perfluorinated Phosphonic Acid in mice. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, 33(4):625, (2012).

Impact/Purpose:

The current study examines the potential adverse developmental effects of PFPA in the mouse

Description:

Perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) are a third member of the perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) family, and are structurally similar to the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates. These emerging chemicals have recently been detected in the environment, particularly in surface water and in effluent of wastewater treatment plants. PFPAs are used primarily as a surfactant defoaming agent in the textile industry and in pesticide production. Previous studies from our laboratory have identified developmental toxicity associated with gestational exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The current study examines the potential adverse developmental effects of PFPA in the mouse. A mixture of PFPAs (Masurf-780) was given to timed-pregnant CD-1 mice by oral gavage daily throughout gestation (GD 1-17) at doses of 5, 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg/kg; controls received deionized water vehicle. PFPA did not alter maternal weight gains, but increased maternal liver weight significantly at 30 and 40 mg/kg. The chemical exposure did not influence the number of live fetuses or fetus weight observed at GD-17, except in the 40 mg/kg group where mortality was observed. In contrast, fetal liver weights were enhanced at doses greater than 10 mg/kg. Neonatal survival and growth was monitored on postnatal days 1-42 and were generally not altered except in the 40 mg/kg group, but the increases in liver weight persisted. These results thus suggest that PFPA exposure during pregnancy did not compromise neonatal survival and postnatal growth as seen with PFOS and PFOA, but the hepatic effects appeared to be similar to these chemicals. This abstract does not necessarily reflect U.S. EPA policy.

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (JOURNAL/PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL)
Product Published Date: 07/01/2012
Record Last Revised: 09/21/2016
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 227049

Organization:

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

TOXICOLOGY ASSESSMENT DIVISION

DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY BRANCH