Science Inventory

Exploring data availability for the Environmental Quality Index to assess environmental health disparities

Citation:

LOBDELL, D. T., L. C. Messer, K. Rapazzo, AND J. S. JAGAI. Exploring data availability for the Environmental Quality Index to assess environmental health disparities. Presented at 43rd Annual Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER), Seattle, WA, June 23 - 26, 2010.

Impact/Purpose:

Four main domains were identified that contribute to environmental quality: air, water, land, and built Isocial environment. An inventory of possible data sources for each of the four domains was created; data sources were identified using web-based search engines (e.g., google), site-specific search engines (e.g., Federal and State data sites), literature-reported data sources (e.g., Pubmed, Science Direct, Toxnet), and word of mouth (e.g., colleagues, other data owners).

Description:

The interaction between environmental insults and human health is complex. Environmental exposures tend to cluster, with disamenities (e.g., landfills, industrial plants) often located in high-minority and largely poor neighborhoods, while wealthier neighborhoods contain amenities that promote and maintain good health (e.g., parks, health clubs, well-stocked stores). The spatial dependence of environmental conditions is inadequately estimated with single exposure models. To address this limitation, an . environmentat quality index (EQI) is under development for all counties in the United States. Four main domains were identified that contribute to environmental quality: air, water, land, and built Isocial environment. An inventory of possible data sources for each of the four domains was created; data sources were identified using web-based search engines (e.g., google), site-specific search engines (e.g., Federal and State data sites), literature-reported data sources (e.g., Pubmed, Science Direct, Toxnet), and word of mouth (e.g., colleagues, other data owners). Data sources representing each domain were evaluated for spatial and temporal coverage and data quality; differences in these parameters were apparent. Seven, 80, 40 and seven data sources were identified for the air, water, land, and built Isocial environment domains, respectively. Currently, three air sources, 12 water sources, 25 land sources and seven built environment/social determinants sources are considered for use in the EQ!. The EQ!, which can be used to identify higher and lower environmental quality neighborhoods, will be used to predict environmentally-related health disparities. (This abstract does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.)

Record Details:

Record Type: DOCUMENT (PRESENTATION/ABSTRACT)
Product Published Date: 06/23/2010
Record Last Revised: 06/23/2010
OMB Category: Other
Record ID: 219780